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Thread: Origin of the Term "Philosopher's Stone"

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Belt View Post
    "Honey-like semen is the mercury
    The controlled breath is the herb
    The fire at Muladhara is the oven
    The product is the Philosopher's Stone
    Oh man! Find this stone in the body
    And fly in the sky at will."

    Tamil Siddhar Bogar
    sometime between 550 and 300 BC
    More proof of my theory that the Stone = DMT

    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.


  2. #22
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    Bogar is a coy bastard
    Honey-like semen is the mercury
    not actual semen but oil with the viscosity of semen.
    The controlled breath is the herb
    herb ?, the controlled water vapour in the vessel, Wind carries it in it belly etc.
    The fire at Muladhara is the oven
    Yes the heat of a mans body, you literally sat on it.
    The product is the Philosopher's Stone
    Yes, being direct for once.
    Oh man! Find this stone in the body
    again coy lil bastard.
    And fly in the sky at will.
    show off.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrysa Lead View Post
    The name of "philosopher's stone" is the result of a wrong translation in english, why ?
    Because it doesn't show the esoteric meaning of what it is.

    In french, the name we use is "Pierre Philosophale".
    Pierre = Stone
    Philosophale = oops no english word for that.
    You may be right about the use of the term in French, you may be right about its correct meaning, but the term/expression certainly doesn't have a French origin (it would be interesting to find the first written mention of the "Pierre Philosophale" in French though)... and the thread began as something etymological and ended up in a philosophical discussion (which is interesting, but somehow a side topic).

    It would be interesting to find the first mention of the "Philosopher's stone" (if we translate from Latin, "Lapis Philosophorum", then it's not really a bad translation). I am sure that the Latin use precedes the French use, but I am not sure if the origin is Latin (when it comes to Greek, I found "Chrysopoeia"... which simply means something that can create gold, but it doesn't mean "Philosopher's stone", though I don't discard that maybe a greet author used a similar Greek expression that can be rightfully translated as "philosopher's stone").

    Such thing doesn't mean that your ideas about the use of the term in French are wrong, but it would be a special case of an "adaptation" or a "jargon" that the French alchemists decided to use after a term that already existed and that can be rightfully translated as "philosopher's stone" if we use the Latin expression... though I do not know if the origin is Latin).

    It would also be interesting to find which one was the first French alchemical text (maybe it was a translation to French of a text written in another language, maybe it was a work originally written in French). Such things are interesting too.

  4. #24
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    "Pierre Philosophale" does come up in Dufresnoy (who was read by Pernety) just before he translates Philalethes Eirenaeus into French. This is early 18th century. Not sure about the trajectory of French literature but it appears at least as far back as Antoine du Verdier's "Bibliotheque" published in 1585. But Lapis Philosophorum is the more common term

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