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Thread: Xenon

  1. #1
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    Xenon

    Hi everyone.

    I’m trying to find some leads on the word “Xernon” or “Xenon” or similar variations of the word. I’m aware of “Xenos”, but that’s not what I’m looking for. I’ve done some research but I’ve exhausted my resources.

    If you know of any similar words, relevant to alchemy, I’d love to hear them.
    Last edited by Kiorionis; 01-30-2018 at 06:04 AM.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  2. #2
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    Could it simply be a case of declensions rather than a different word????


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    I think you're right, Thanks! I didn't think to look in this direction.

    Makes sense now, xenos to mean a 'guest friend' or 'stranger' -- and then xenon in the accusative, this stranger expressing the goal of a motion.

    Does that make sense in Greek grammar? I'm not familiar.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  4. #4
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    It can be the NEUTER form too (English is not like that, but in Greek, Latin and in many other languages -i.e, all the Romance languages), the words have genders.

    However, if it is an accusative, then it simply means that it is the direct object of the sentence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_(grammar)
    So you would often find it in a sentence that has a transitive verb: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transitive_verb and "Xenon" is the object of that verb.
    i.e, "The alchemist was greeting the xenon. Later the xenos went to sleep." (in the first sentence the word is the object, in the second it is the subject... but it's the same word).

    Other than that, I do not know what you are reading, but in some Latin texts (specially late medieval and renaissance) there are sometimes Greek words transliterated to latin and the writers simply began to give the words Latin declensions (i.e, http://www.levity.com/alchemy/schweig.html ... in which the plural of "Parergon" becomes "Parergi", as if it was a Latin word... when the Greek plural is "parerga", not "parergi").

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