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Thread: Just STOP it!

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Yes, modern glass jars/bottles used for packaging food & beverages are similar types of glass as those available to the alchemists. Those types of glass have lower melting & softening points than borosilicate glasses. They are also more sensitive to thermal shock. The alchemists heated their glasses very gradually to avoid fracture. If strong temperatures were to be used, and no clay vessels were available, they would coat their glasses with refractory materials (usually mixtures involving sand and clay) in order to make a "shell" that would hold the glass and prevent it from deforming and eventually "oozing" to the bottom of the furnace. The refractory shell also helps diminish the thermal shock to the glass, since it is not directly exposed to the heat (it reaches the refractory shell first, and from there it gradually moves on to the glass.)
    After doing a search for availability of Scientific soda-lime glass containers it seams I will have to stick with what I use as could not find any. Shame because I would prefer to use a simple spirit lamp rather then an oxygen torch.

  2. #22
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    The mystery of Schmuldvich's glass stopper continues....stay tuned for next episode

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luxus View Post
    After doing a search for availability of Scientific soda-lime glass containers it seams I will have to stick with what I use as could not find any. Shame because I would prefer to use a simple spirit lamp rather then an oxygen torch.
    You don't have to use an oxygen torch with borosilicate glass. Just a regular gas burner/torch will do.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    You don't have to use an oxygen torch with borosilicate glass. Just a regular gas burner/torch will do.
    You sure about that? borosilicate glass is otherwise known as pirex famous for its use in various cookware.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDP View Post
    Rubber stoppers seem to resist ethanol and other alcohol vapors well. Hydrochloric acid vapors and chlorine gas don't seem to do much of anything to them either. Acetic acid vapors, on the other hand, will damage them over prolonged periods of exposure. And nitric acid vapors will soon start damaging them, even more so when hot.
    Some rubber materials are not resistant to alcohol. You may not see an effect on the rubber, but moonshiners would not use it, as the taste of the booze might be "rubberish". When wanting to obtain a product as pure and tasty as possible, which is not unusual in alchemy and definately in spagyrics too (but of course obviously no cleanroom is needed), I would not use them.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luxus View Post
    You sure about that? borosilicate glass is otherwise known as pirex famous for its use in various cookware.
    Home ovens are usually only heated to 450 F, which is well below the max temperature of a torch.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luxus View Post
    You sure about that? borosilicate glass is otherwise known as pirex famous for its use in various cookware.
    If you take care and follow JDP's safety instructions, you won't need it. Especially the use of an oxygen torch is not necessary.
    Sorry for pointing out safety issues all the time, but I would additionaly recommend the use of safety goggles when doing high temperature heatings on glas vessels especially with doubtful content.
    Last edited by Florius Frammel; 02-05-2018 at 04:59 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    Some rubber materials are not resistant to alcohol. You may not see an effect on the rubber, but moonshiners would not use it, as the taste of the booze might be "rubberish". When wanting to obtain a product as pure and tasty as possible, which is not unusual in alchemy and definately in spagyrics too (but of course obviously no cleanroom is needed), I would not use them.
    Well those rubber stoppers can be easily smelled by placing them a short distance from the nose which is all the proof you would need to know that they out-gas which could contaminate a product.

    Cork and wood stoppers also can contaminate a product via tannins or encourage spoiling.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    I would not use rubber stoppers when using organic solvents like for example ethanol. Silicon is a good choice in most and basic works in the vegetable kingdom because the material does not interact with those solvents easily. Working in the mineral kingdom and especially with strong acids/alkalis I'd use glass stoppers. I think in former times they might have used clay or mixtures of clay with lineseed oil. At least they used it to lute their distillation devices with that material as it seems to be pretty inert.
    Be careful with the "clay is inert" thing. "Clay" is a very generic term, but some clays are not inert at all when it comes to acids (i.e, they become like a jelly and then they fall into the vessel... I have seen it happening). I assume it is safer to test the acid you are going to use with the clay you are going to use first (i.e, in a normal glass vessel with a glass stopper).

    Quote Originally Posted by Luxus View Post
    You sure about that? borosilicate glass is otherwise known as pirex famous for its use in various cookware.
    Sometimes it's good to see something similar. A Butane torch or a bunsen will do the trick.





    (it's not EXACTLY the same thing, but similar).
    Last edited by zoas23; 02-06-2018 at 03:02 AM. Reason: youtube

  10. #30
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    The second video mentions annealing the glass. I’m pretty sure I read something about putting the fresh-melted glass in a kiln for awhile to anneal. Could be wrong though. Also, probably not relevant.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

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