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Thread: Brown's Gas

  1. #1
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    Brown's Gas

    I have started this thread because I am absolutely clueless about this topic and I am wondering if anyone here has experimented with it or otherwise has some sort of knowledge to share on this matter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andro View Post
    I have started this thread because I am absolutely clueless about this topic and I am wondering if anyone here has experimented with it or otherwise has some sort of knowledge to share on this matter
    As I understand it, "Brown's Gas" is a "fringe science" term for oxyhydrogen. That means a mixture of H2 and O2 in the ratio of 2:1.

    It is obtained when doing an electrolysis of water and mixing the gases in the quantities they are produced that way (2:1).

    I did that often with a Hofmann Voltameter.

    Be very careful!! This mixture is highly explosive! Avoid fire sources in any case when trying this on yourself!

    How some people can see special properties of this mixture is beyond my knowledge and imagination.

    However the reaction between H2 and O2 I described above can be used (under special electrochemical, relatively safe and slow conditions) to create electricity and is used in some vehicles you see on the streets (Hydrogen Cars) and is not only therefore well examined nowadays. Hydrogen alone is the element that's probably the best examined ever as I already wrote in the Spiritus Mundi thread.

    Therefore I think it's very unlikely that those transformation abilities claimed by the source you posted there exist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    Avoid fire sources in any case when trying this on yourself!
    Brown's Gas is reportedly used for torches And the generated flame allegedly burns at much lower temperatures, while other claims state that the temperature of the flame "adjusts" itself to the material it comes into contact with.

    Here's some info I found: http://www.eagle-research.com/browngas/whatisbg/whatis.php

    From the above source:

    Normal electrolyzers encourage the hydrogen and oxygen to drop to their di-atomic state.

    Di-atomic means the hydrogen formed H2 and the oxygen formed O2.

    The di-atomic state is a lower energy state, the energy difference shows up as heat in the electrolyzer. This energy is now unavailable to the flame.

    WHAT IF a significant number of these H and O atoms did not reform into di-atomic molecules? We start by adding 442.4 Kcal per mole to split water using electrolysis.

    This is an endothermic (energy absorbing) action.

    But if we have no, or little, 're-bonding' into di-atomic molecules, then our electrolyzer wouldn't heat up, because there would be no exothermic reaction that would cause excess heat, beyond the agitation of the fluid by the bubbles.

    This 'lack of heat' in the electrolyzer is what I noted in my experiments that actually produced Brown's Gas.
    And something for the German speakers : http://www.browns-gas.de/?topic=2

    Allegedly, "Brown's Gas" is not necessarily the same as "HHO Gas".

    Is there anyone here who actually experimented with Brown's Gas?


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    Last edited by Andro; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:34 PM.

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    Under normal conditions monoatomic hydrogen is very very unstable. Even a single proton of hydrogen which theoretically would be more stable than monoatomic hydrogen is not present isolated in water or an acid. In (Bronstedt) acid-base reactions for example the proton donated by the acid is contemporaneously accepted by the base.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    Under normal conditions monoatomic hydrogen is very very unstable.
    Does anyone know what is the theoretical average time that is required for two hydrogen atoms to recombine into a hydrogen molecule (H2) in free air?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    As I understand it, "Brown's Gas" is a "fringe science" term for oxyhydrogen. That means a mixture of H2 and O2 in the ratio of 2:1. It is obtained when doing an electrolysis of water and mixing the gases in the quantities they are produced that way (2:1).
    There are various "versions" of Brown's gas and the one you describe is the most "diluted". From what I remember, Brown gas requires pulsed current, special electrodes and a special frequency. The first sign that you produce Brown's gas is measuring alterations of the Faraday Efficiency. Well, good luck, because this is violating energy conservation laws. It is not a wonder why Brown gas production cannot be replicated so easily, if it exists...

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