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Thread: Anyone else notice a trend among creation mythologiess?

  1. #1
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    Anyone else notice a trend among creation mythologiess?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atum

    Chaos, primordial waters, etc. They appear in Egyptian, the Talmud, Greek, and Roman. Been trying to figure out a way to hint at this for months. I still haven't finished my research, so I'm not sure, but I think our ancient elders had a reason for framing and preserving these stories as they did.

    Just be careful with your research when the pattern catches your eye. I've spent many hours digging around this rabbit hole.

  2. #2
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    Yes indeed! The Creation myths abound with Truth!



    Genesis Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 are intriguing and read like an alchemical treatise. The rest of the Bible too, when read with opened eyes is fascinating.



    GENESIS CHAPTER 1

    1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.

    2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

    3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

    4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

    5 And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.

    6 And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.

    7 And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament from the waters which were above the firmament: and it was so.

    8 And God called the firmament Heaven. And the evening and the morning were the second day.

    9 And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.

    10 And God called the dry land Earth; and the gathering together of the waters called he Seas: and God saw that it was good.

    11 And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so.

    12 And the earth brought forth grass, and herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind: and God saw that it was good.

    13 And the evening and the morning were the third day.

    14 And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years:

    15 And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth: and it was so.

    16 And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also.

    17 And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth,

    18 And to rule over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and God saw that it was good.

    19 And the evening and the morning were the fourth day.

    20 And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.

    21 And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good.

    22 And God blessed them, saying, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth.

    23 And the evening and the morning were the fifth day.

    24 And God said, Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so.

    25 And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.

    26 And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.

    27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.

    28 And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.

    29 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat.

    30 And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so.

    31 And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day.



    GENESIS CHAPTER 2

    1 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.

    2 And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.

    3 And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.

    4 These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens,

    5 And every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground.

    6 But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.

    7 And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

    8 And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed.

    9 And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.

    10 And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads.

    11 The name of the first is Pison: that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold;

    12 And the gold of that land is good: there is bdellium and the onyx stone.

    13 And the name of the second river is Gihon: the same is it that compasseth the whole land of Ethiopia.

    14 And the name of the third river is Hiddekel: that is it which goeth toward the east of Assyria. And the fourth river is Euphrates.

    15 And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.

    16 And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat:

    17 But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.

    18 And the Lord God said, It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him an help meet for him.

    19 And out of the ground the Lord God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.

    20 And Adam gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field; but for Adam there was not found an help meet for him.

    21 And the Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and he slept: and he took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof;

    22 And the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made he a woman, and brought her unto the man.

    23 And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman, because she was taken out of Man.

    24 Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.

    25 And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.


    The Qur'an doesn't have it all laid out in one place, but throughout the Qur'an anecdotes can be found regarding Creation. In fact, there are tons of passages throughout the Qur'an with alchemical overtones.

    Passages relating to creation occur in the Qur'an is different places, such as: "Verily in the heavens and the earth are signs for those who believe. And in the creation of yourselves, and the fact that animals are scattered (through the earth), are signs for those of assured faith. And in the alternation of night and day, and that fact that Allah sends down sustenance from the sky, and revives therewith the earth after its death, and in the change of the winds, are signs for those who are wise" (45:3-5).

    The Qur'an says that "the heavens and the earth were joined together as one unit, before We clove them asunder" (21:30). Following this big explosion, Allah "turned to the sky, and it had been (as) smoke. He said to it and to the earth: 'Come together, willingly or unwillingly.' They said: 'We come (together) in willing obedience'" (41:11). Thus the elements and what was to become the planets and stars began to cool, come together, and form into shape, following the natural laws that Allah established in the universe.

    The Qur'an further states that Allah created the sun, the moon, and the planets, each with their own individual courses or orbits. "It is He Who created the night and the day, and the sun and the moon; all (the celestial bodies) swim along, each in its rounded course" (21:33).

    "The heavens, We have built them with power. And verily, We are expanding it" (51:47). There has been some historical debate among Muslim scholars about the precise meaning of this verse, since knowledge of the universe's expansion was only recently discovered.

    The Qur'an states that "Allah created the heavens and the earth, and all that is between them, in six days" (7:54). While on the surface this might seem similar to the account related in the Bible, there are some important distinctions.

    The verses that mention "six days" use the Arabic word "youm" (day). This word appears several other times in the Qur'an, each denoting a different measurement of time. In one case, the measure of a day is equated with 50,000 years (70:4), whereas another verse states that "a day in the sight of your Lord is like 1,000 years of your reckoning" (22:47). The word "youm" is thus understood, within the Qur'an, to be a long period of time -- an era or eon. Therefore, Muslims interpret the description of a "six day" creation as six distinct periods or eons. The length of these periods is not precisely defined, nor are the specific developments that took place during each period.

    After completing the Creation, the Qur'an describes that Allah "settled Himself upon the Throne" (57:4) to oversee His work. A distinct point is made to counter the Biblical idea of a day of rest: "We created the heavens and the earth and all that is between them in six days, nor did any sense of weariness touch Us" (50:38).

    Allah is never "done" with His work, because the process of creation is ongoing. Each new child who is born, every seed that sprouts into a sapling, every new species that appears on earth, is part of the ongoing process of Allah's creation. "He it is Who created the heavens and the earth in six days, then established Himself on the Throne. He knows what enters within the heart of the earth, and what comes forth out of it, what comes down from heaven, and what mounts up to it. And He is with you wherever you may be. And Allah sees well all that you do" (57:4).

    Descriptions of creation in the Qur'an are set in context to remind the readers of Allah's majesty and wisdom. "What is the matter with you, that you are not conscious of Allah's majesty, seeing that it is He Who has created you in diverse stages? See you not how Allah has created the seven heavens one above another, and made the moon a light in their midst, and made the sun as a (glorious) lamp? And Allah has produced you from the earth, growing (gradually)" (71:13-17).

    The Qur'an describes that Allah "made from water every living thing" (21:30). Another verse describes how "Allah has created every animal from water. Of them are some that creep on their bellies, some that walk on two legs, and some that walk on four. Allah creates what He wills, for truly Allah has power over all things" (24:45). These verses support the scientific theory that life began in the Earth's oceans.

    While Islam recognizes the general idea of the development of life in stages, over a period of time, human beings are considered as a special act of creation. Islam teaches that human beings are a unique life form that was created by Allah in a special way, with unique gifts and abilities unlike any other: a soul and conscience, knowledge, and free will. In short, Muslims do not believe that human beings randomly evolved from apes. The life of human beings began with the creation of two people, a male and a female named Adam and Hawwa (Eve).

    The Qur'an describes how Allah created Adam: "We created man from sounding clay, from mud moulded into shape..." (15:26). And, "He began the creation of man from clay, and made his progeny from a quintessence of fluid" (32:7-8). Thus, human beings have a fundamental attachment to the earth.

    While the creation of Eve is not described in detail, the Qur'an does make it clear that a "mate" was created with Adam, from the same nature and soul. "It is He Who created you from a single person, and made his mate of like nature, in order that he might dwell with her in love" (7:189). She is not mentioned by name in the Qur'an, but in Islamic tradition she is known as "Hawwa" (Eve).

    From these two individuals, generations of human beings have inhabited the earth. "Oh humankind! We created you from a single pair of a male and a female, and made you into nations and tribes, so that you may know each other (not that ye may despise each other). Verily the most honored among you in the sight of Allah is the who is the most righteous of you. And Allah has full knowledge and is well acquainted (with all things)" (49:13).


    The Japanese story of Creation found in the Kojiki ["Records of Ancient Matters"], a.k.a. Furukotofumi, is pertinent and exceptionally interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Japanese Creation Myth
    Hereupon all the Heavenly Deities commanded the two Deities His Augustness the Male-Who-Invites and Her Augustness the Female-Who-Invites, ordering them to "make, consolidate, and give birth to this drifting land."
    Granting to them an heavenly jewelled spear, they thus deigned to charge them.
    So the two Deities, standing upon the Floating Bridge of Heaven, pushed down the jewelled spear and stirred with it, whereupon, when they had stiffed the brine till it went curdle-curdle, and drew the spear up, the brine that dripped down from the end of the spear was piled up and became an island.
    This is the Island of Onogoro.

    Through giving birth to this child her august private parts were burnt, and she sickened and lay down.
    The names of the Deities born from her vomit were the Deity Metal-Mountain-Prince and next the Deity Metal-Mountain-Princess.
    The names of the Deities that were born from her faeces were the Deity Clay-Viscid-Prince and next the Deity Clay-Viscid-Princess.
    The names of the Deities that were next born from her urine were the Deity Mitsuhanome and next the Young-Wondrous-Producing-Deity.


    The Babylonian myth of Creation is a joy to read. Written about 1200BC, but probably much older, Enuma Elish contains the Babylonian myth of Creation and is also relevant to my studies. You might find this particular story interesting as well.


    THE FIRST TABLET
    When in the height heaven was not named,
    And the earth beneath did not yet bear a name,
    And the primeval Apsu, who begat them,
    And chaos, Tiamut, the mother of them both
    Their waters were mingled together,
    And no field was formed, no marsh was to be seen;
    When of the gods none had been called into being,
    And none bore a name, and no destinies were ordained;
    Then were created the gods in the midst of heaven,
    Lahmu and Lahamu were called into being...
    Ages increased,...
    Then Ansar and Kisar were created, and over them....
    Long were the days, then there came forth.....
    Anu, their son,...
    Ansar and Anu...
    And the god Anu...
    Nudimmud, whom his fathers, his begetters.....
    Abounding in all wisdom,...'
    He was exceeding strong...
    He had no rival
    Thus were established and were... the great gods.
    But Tiamat and Apsu were still in confusion...
    They were troubled and...
    In disorder...
    Apru was not diminished in might...
    And Tiamat roared...
    She smote, and their deeds...
    Their way was evil...
    Then Apsu, the begetter of the great gods,
    Cried unto Mummu, his minister, and said unto him:
    "O Mummu, thou minister that rejoicest my spirit,
    Come, unto Tiamut let us go!
    So they went and before Tiamat they lay down,
    They consulted on a plan with regard to the gods, their sons.
    Apsu opened his mouth and spake,
    And unto Tiamut, the glistening one, he addressed the word:
    ...their way...
    By day I can not rest, by night I can not lie down in peace.
    But I will destroy their way, I will...
    Let there be lamentation, and let us lie down again in peace."
    When Tiamat heard these words,
    She raged and cried aloud...
    She... grievously...,
    She uttered a curse, and unto Apsu she spake:
    "What then shall we do?
    Let their way be made difficult, and let us lie down again in peace."
    Mummu answered, and gave counsel unto Apsu,
    ...and hostile to the gods was the counsel Mummu gave:
    Come, their way is strong, but thou shalt destroy it;
    Then by day shalt thou have rest, by night shalt thou lie down in peace."
    Apsu harkened unto him and his countenance grew bright,
    Since he (Mummu) planned evil against the gods his sons.
    ... he was afraid...,
    His knees became weak; they gave way beneath him,
    Because of the evil which their first-born had planned.
    ... their... they altered.
    ... they...,
    Lamentation they sat in sorrow
    Then Ea, who knoweth all that is, went up and he beheld their muttering.
    ... he spake:
    ... thy... he hath conquered and
    ... he weepeth and sitteth in tribulation.
    ... of fear,
    ... we shall not lie down in peace.
    ... Apsu is laid waste,
    ... and Mummu, who were taken captive, in...
    ... thou didst...
    ... let us lie down in peace.
    ... they will smite....
    ... let us lie down in peace.
    ... thou shalt take vengeance for them,
    ... unto the tempest shalt thou...!"
    And Tiamat harkened unto the word of the bright god, and said:
    ... shalt thou entrust! let us wage war!"
    ... the gods in the midst of...
    ... for the gods did she create.
    They banded themselves together and at the side of Tiamat they advanced;
    They were furious; they devised mischief without resting night and day.
    They prepared for battle, fuming and raging;
    They joined their forces and made war,
    Ummu-Hubur [Tiamat] who formed all things,
    Made in addition weapons invincible; she spawned monster-serpents,
    Sharp of tooth, and merciless of fang;
    With poison, instead of blood, she filled their bodies.
    Fierce monster-vipers she clothed with terror,
    With splendor she decked them, she made them of lofty stature.
    Whoever beheld them, terror overcame him,
    Their bodies reared up and none could withstand their attack.
    She set up vipers and dragons, and the monster Lahamu,
    And hurricanes, and raging hounds, and scorpion-men,
    And mighty tempests, and fish-men, and rams;
    They bore cruel weapons, without fear of the fight.
    Her commands were mighty, none could resist them;
    After this fashion, huge of stature, she made eleven [kinds of] monsters.
    Among the gods who were her sons, inasmuch as he had given her support,
    She exalted Kingu; in their midst she raised him to power.
    To march before the forces, to lead the host,
    To give the battle-signal, to advance to the attack,
    To direct the battle, to control the fight,
    Unto him she entrusted; in costly raiment she made him sit, saying:
    I have uttered thy spell, in the assembly of the gods I have raised thee to power.
    The dominion over all the gods have I entrusted unto him.
    Be thou exalted, thou my chosen spouse,
    May they magnify thy name over all of them the Anunnaki."
    She gave him the Tablets of Destiny, on his breast she laid them, saying:
    Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established."
    Now Kingu, thus exalted, having received the power of Anu,
    Decreed the fate among the gods his sons, saying:
    "Let the opening of your mouth quench the Fire-god;
    Whoso is exalted in the battle, let him display his might!"
    THE SECOND TABLET
    Tiamat made weighty her handiwork,
    Evil she wrought against the gods her children.
    To avenge Apsu, Tiamat planned evil,
    But how she had collected her forces, the god unto Ea divulged.
    Ea harkened to this thing, and
    He was grievously afflicted and he sat in sorrow.
    The days went by, and his anger was appeased,
    And to the place of Ansar his father he took his way.
    He went and, standing before Ansar, the father who begat him,
    All that Tiamat had plotted he repeated unto him,
    Saying, "Tiamat our mother hath conceived a hatred for us,
    With all her force she rageth, full of wrath.
    All the gods have turned to her,
    With those, whom ye created, thev go at her side.
    They are banded together and at the side of Tiamat they advance;
    They are furious, they devise mischief without resting night and day.
    They prepare for battle, fuming and raging;
    They have joined their forces and are making war.
    Ummu-Hubur, who formed all things,
    Hath made in addition weapons invincible; she hath spawned monster-serpents,
    Sharp of tooth, and merciless of fang.
    With poison, instead of blood, she hath filled their bodies.
    Fierce monster-vipers she hath clothed with terror,
    With splendor she hath decked them; she hath made them of lofty stature.
    Whoever beholdeth them is overcome by terror,
    Their bodies rear up and none can withstand their attack.
    She hath set up vipers, and dragons, and the monster Lahamu,
    And hurricanes and raging hounds, and scorpion-men,
    And mighty tempests, and fish-men and rams;
    They bear cruel weapons, without fear of the fight.
    Her commands are mighty; none can resist them;
    After this fashion, huge of stature, hath she made eleven monsters.
    Among the gods who are her sons, inasmuch as he hath given her support,
    She hath exalted Kingu; in their midst she hath raised him to power.
    To march before the forces, to lead the host,
    To give the battle-signal, to advance to the attack.
    To direct the battle, to control the fight,
    Unto him hath she entrusted; in costly raiment she hath made him sit, saving:.
    I have uttered thy spell; in the assembly of the gods I have raised thee to power,
    The dominion over all the gods have I entrusted unto thee.
    Be thou exalted, thou my chosen spouse,
    May they magnify thy name over all of them
    She hath given him the Tablets of Destiny, on his breast she laid them, saying:
    'Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established.'
    Now Kingu, thus exalted, having received the power of Anu,
    Decreed the fate for the gods, her sons, saying:
    'Let the opening of your mouth quench the Fire-god;
    Whoso is exalted in the battle, let him display his might!'"
    When Ansar heard how Tiamat was mightily in revolt,
    he bit his lips, his mind was not at peace,
    ..., he made a bitter lamentation:
    ... battle,
    ... thou...
    Mummu and Apsu thou hast smitten
    But Tiamat hath exalted Kingu, and where is one who can oppose her?
    ... deliberation
    ... the ... of the gods, Nudimmud.
    Ansar unto his son addressed the word:
    "... my mighty hero,
    Whose strength is great and whose onslaught can not be withstood,
    Go and stand before Tiamat,
    That her spirit may be appeased, that her heart may be merciful.
    But if she will not harken unto thy word,
    Our word shalt thou speak unto her, that she may be pacified."
    He heard the word of his father Ansar
    And he directed his path to her, toward her he took the way.
    Ann drew nigh, he beheld the muttering of Tiamat,
    But he could not withstand her, and he turned back.
    ... Ansar
    ... he spake unto him:
    an avenger...
    ... valiant
    ... in the place of his decision
    ... he spake unto him:
    ... thy father
    " Thou art my son, who maketh merciful his heart.
    ... to the battle shalt thou draw nigh,
    he that shall behold thee shall have peace."
    And the lord rejoiced at the word of his father,
    And he drew nigh and stood before Ansar.
    Ansar beheld him and his heart was filled with joy,
    He kissed him on the lips and his fear departed from him.
    "O my father, let not the word of thy lips be overcome,
    Let me go, that I may accomplish all that is in thy heart.
    O Ansar, let not the word of thy lips be overcome,
    Let me go, that I may accomplish all that is in thy heart."
    What man is it, who hath brought thee forth to battle?
    ... Tiamat, who is a woman, is armed and attacketh thee.
    ... rejoice and be glad;
    The neck of Tiamat shalt thou swiftly trample under foot.
    ... rejoice and be glad;
    The neck of Tiamat shalt thou swiftly trample under foot.
    0 my son, who knoweth all wisdom,
    Pacify Tiamat with thy pure incantation.
    Speedily set out upon thy way,
    For thy blood shall not be poured out; thou shalt return again."
    The lord rejoiced at the word of his father,
    His heart exulted, and unto his father he spake:
    "O Lord of the gods, Destiny of the great gods,
    If I, your avenger,
    Conquer Tiamat and give you life,
    Appoint an assembly, make my fate preeminent and proclaim it.
    In Upsukkinaku seat yourself joyfully together,
    With my word in place of you will I decree fate.
    May whatsoever I do remain unaltered,
    May the word of my lips never be chanced nor made of no avail."
    THE THIRD TABLET
    Ansar opened his mouth, and
    Unto Gaga, his minister, spake the word.
    "O Gaga, thou minister that rejoicest my spirit,
    Unto Lahmu and Lahamu will I send thee.
    ... thou canst attain,
    ... thou shalt cause to be brought before thee.
    ... let the gods, all of them,
    Make ready for a feast, at a banquet let them sit,
    Let them eat bread, let them mix wine,
    That for Marduk, their avenger they may decree the fate.
    Go, Gaga, stand before them,
    And all that I tell thee, repeat unto them, and say:
    'Ansar, vour son, hath sent me,
    The purpose of his heart he hath made known unto me.
    The purpose of his heart he hath made known unto me.
    He saith that Tiamat our mother hath conceived a hatred for us,
    With all her force she rageth, full of wrath.
    All the gods have turned to her,
    With those, whom ye created, they go at her side.
    They are banded together, and at the side of Tiamat they advance;
    They are furious, they devise mischief without resting night and day.
    They prepare for battle, fuming and raging;
    They have joined their forces and are making war.
    Ummu-Hubur, who formed all things,
    Hath made in addition weapons invincible; she hath spawned monster-serpents,
    Sharp of tooth and merciless of fang.
    With poison, instead of blood, she hath filled their bodies.
    Fierce monster-vipers she hath clothed with terror,
    With splendor she hath decked them; she hath made them of lofty stature.
    Whoever beboldeth them, terror overcometh him,
    Their bodies rear up and none can withstand their attack.
    She hath set up vipers, and dragons, and the monster Lahamu,
    And hurricanes, and raging bounds, and scorpion-men,
    And mighty tempests, and fish-men, and rams;
    They bear merciless weapons, without fear of the fight.
    Her commands are miahty; none can. resist them;
    After this fashion, huge of stature, hath she made eleven monsters.
    Among the gods who are her sons, inasmuch as he hath given her support,
    She hath exalted Kingu; in their midst she hath raised him to power.
    To march before the forces, to lead the host,
    To give the battle-signal, to advance to the attack,
    To direct the battle, to control the fight,
    Unto him hath she entrusted; in costly raiment she hath made him sit, saying:
    I have uttered thy spell; in the assembly of the gods
    I have raised thee to power,
    The dominion over all the gods have I entrusted unto thee.
    Be thou exalted, thou my chosen spouse,
    May they magnify thy name over all of them ... the Anunnaki."
    She hath given him the Tablets of Destiny, on his breast she laid them, saying:
    Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established."
    Now Kingu, thus exalted, having received the power of Anu,
    Decreed the fate for the gods, her sons, saving:
    Let the opening of your mouth quench the Fire-god;
    Whoso is exalted in the battle, let him display his might!"
    I sent Anu, but he could not withstand her;
    Nudimmud was afraid and turned back.
    But Marduk hath set out, the director of the gods, your son;
    To set out against Tiamat his heart hath prompted him.
    He opened his mouth and spake unto me, saying: "If I, your avenger,
    Conquer Tiamat and give you life,
    Appoint an assembly, make my fate preeminent and proclaim it.
    In Upsukkinaku seat yourself joyfully together;
    With my word in place of you will I decree fate.
    May whatsoever I do remain unaltered,
    May the word of my lips never be changed nor made of no avail."'
    Hasten, therefore, and swiftly decree for him the fate which you bestow,
    That he may go and fight your strong enemy.
    Gaga went, he took his way and
    Humbly before Lahmu and Lahamu, the gods, his fathers,
    He made obeisance, and he kissed the ground at their feet.
    He humbled himself; then he stood up and spake unto them saying:
    "Ansar, your son, hath sent me,
    The purpose of his heart he hath made known unto me.
    He saith that Tiamat our mother hath conceived a hatred for us,
    With all her force she rageth, full of wrath.
    All the gods have turned to her,
    With those, whom ye created, they go at her side.
    They are banded together and at the side of Tiamat they advance;
    They are furious, they devise mischief without resting night and day.
    They prepare for battle, fuming and raging;
    They have joined their forces and are making war.
    Ummu-Hubur, who formed all things,
    Hath made in addition weapons invincible; she hath spawned monster-serpents,
    Sharp of tooth and merciless of fang.
    With poison, instead of blood, she hath filled their bodies.
    Fierce monster-vipers she hath clothed with terror,
    With splendor she hath decked them, she hath made them of lofty stature.
    Whoever beboldeth them, terror overcometh him,
    Their bodies rear up and none can withstand their attack.
    She hath set up vipers, and dragons, and the monster Lahamu,
    And hurricanes, and raging hounds, and scorpion-men,
    And mighty tempests, and fish-men, and rams;
    They bear merciless weapons, without fear of the fight.
    Her commands are mighty; none can resist them;
    After this fashion, huge of stature, hath she made eleven monsters.
    Among the gods who are her sons, inasmuch as he hath given her support,
    She hath exalted Kingu; in their midst she hath raised him to power.
    To march before the forces, to lead the host,
    To give the battle-signal, to advance to the attack, To direct the battle, to control the fight,
    Unto him hath she entrusted; in costlv raiment she hath made him sit, saving:
    I have uttered thy spell; in the assembly of the gods I have raised thee to power,
    The dominion over all the gods have I entrusted unto thee.
    Be thou exalted, thou my chosen spouse,
    May they magnify thy name over all of them...the Anunnaki.
    She hath given him the Tablets of Destiny on his breast she laid them, saving:
    Thy command shall not be without avail, and the word of thy mouth shall be established.'
    Now Kingu, thus exalted, having received the power of Anu,
    Decreed the fate for the gods, her sons, saying:
    'Let the opening of your mouth quench the Fire-god;
    Whoso is exalted in the battle, let him display his might!'
    I sent Anu, but he could not withstand her;
    Nudimmud was afraid and turned back.
    But Marduk hath set out, the director of the gods, your son;
    To set out against Tiamat his heart hath prompted him.
    He opened his mouth and spake unto me, saying:
    'If I, your avenger,
    Conquer Tiamat and give you life,
    Appoint an assembly, make my fate preeminent and proclaim it.
    In Upsukkinaku seat yourselves joyfully together;
    With my word in place of you will I decree fate.
    May, whatsoever I do remain unaltered,
    May the word of my lips never be changed nor made of no avail.'
    Hasten, therefore, and swiftly decree for him the fate which you bestow,
    That he may go and fight your strong enemy!
    Lahmu and Lahamu heard and cried aloud
    All of the Igigi [The elder gods] wailed bitterly, saying:
    What has been altered so that they should
    We do not understand the deed of Tiamat!
    Then did they collect and go,
    The great gods, all of them, who decree fate.
    They entered in before Ansar, they filled...
    They kissed one another, in the assembly...;
    They made ready for the feast, at the banquet they sat;
    They ate bread, they mixed sesame-wine.
    The sweet drink, the mead, confused their...
    They were drunk with drinking, their bodies were filled.
    They were wholly at ease, their spirit was exalted;
    Then for Marduk, their avenger, did they decree the fate.
    THE FOURTH TABLET
    They prepared for him a lordly chamber,
    Before his fathers as prince he took his place.
    "Thou art chiefest among the great gods,
    Thy fate is unequaled, thy word is Anu!
    O Marduk, thou art chiefest among the great gods,
    Thy fate is unequaled, thy word is Anu!
    Henceforth not without avail shall be thy command,
    In thy power shall it be to exalt and to abase.
    Established shall be the word of thy mouth, irresistible shall be thy command,
    None among the gods shall transgress thy boundary.
    Abundance, the desire of the shrines of the gods,
    Shall be established in thy sanctuary, even though they lack offerings.
    O Marduk, thou art our avenger!
    We give thee sovereignty over the whole world.
    Sit thou down in might; be exalted in thy command.
    Thy weapon shall never lose its power; it shall crush thy foe.
    O Lord, spare the life of him that putteth his trust in thee,
    But as for the god who began the rebellion, pour out his life."
    Then set they in their midst a garment,
    And unto Marduk,- their first-born they spake:
    "May thy fate, O lord, be supreme among the gods,
    To destroy and to create; speak thou the word, and thy command shall be fulfilled.
    Command now and let the garment vanish;
    And speak the word again and let the garment reappear!
    Then he spake with his mouth, and the garment vanished;
    Again he commanded it, and. the garment reappeared.
    When the gods, his fathers, beheld the fulfillment of his word,
    They rejoiced, and they did homage unto him, saying, " Marduk is king!"
    They bestowed upon him the scepter, and the throne, and the ring,
    They give him an invincible weapony which overwhelmeth the foe.
    Go, and cut off the life of Tiamat,
    And let the wind carry her blood into secret places."
    After the gods his fathers had decreed for the lord his fate,
    They caused him to set out on a path of prosperity and success.
    He made ready the bow, he chose his weapon,
    He slung a spear upon him and fastened it...
    He raised the club, in his right hand he grasped it,
    The bow and the quiver he hung at his side.
    He set the lightning in front of him,
    With burning flame he filled his body.
    He made a net to enclose the inward parts of Tiamat,
    The four winds he stationed so that nothing of her might escape;
    The South wind and the North wind and the East wind and the West wind
    He brought near to the net, the gift of his father Anu.
    He created the evil wind, and the tempest, and the hurricane,
    And the fourfold wind, and the sevenfold wind, and the whirlwind, and the wind which had no equal;
    He sent forth the winds which he had created, the seven of them;
    To disturb the inward parts of Tiamat, they followed after him.
    Then the lord raised the thunderbolt, his mighty weapon,
    He mounted the chariot, the storm unequaled for terror,
    He harnessed and yoked unto it four horses,
    Destructive, ferocious, overwhelming, and swift of pace;
    ... were their teeth, they were flecked with foam;
    They were skilled in... , they had been trained to trample underfoot.
    ... . mighty in battle,
    Left and right....
    His garment was... , he was clothed with terror,
    With overpowering brightness his head was crowned.
    Then he set out, he took his way,
    And toward the raging Tiamat he set his face.
    On his lips he held ...,
    ... he grasped in his hand.
    Then they beheld him, the gods beheld him,
    The gods his fathers beheld him, the gods beheld him.
    And the lord drew nigh, he gazed upon the inward parts of Tiamat,
    He perceived the muttering of Kingu, her spouse.
    As Marduk gazed, Kingu was troubled in his gait,
    His will was destroyed and his motions ceased.
    And the gods, his helpers, who marched by his side,
    Beheld their leader's..., and their sight was troubled.
    But Tiamat... , she turned not her neck,
    With lips that failed not she uttered rebellious words:
    "... thy coming as lord of the gods,
    From their places have they gathered, in thy place are they! "
    Then the lord raised the thunderbolt, his mighty weapon,
    And against Tiamat, who was raging, thus he sent the word:
    Thou art become great, thou hast exalted thyself on high,
    And thy heart hath prompted thee to call to battle.
    ... their fathers...,
    ... their... thou hatest...
    Thou hast exalted Kingu to be thy spouse,
    Thou hast... him, that, even as Anu, he should issue deerees.
    thou hast followed after evil,
    And against the gods my fathers thou hast contrived thy wicked plan.
    Let then thy host be equipped, let thy weapons be girded on!
    Stand! I and thou, let us join battle!
    When Tiamat heard these words,
    She was like one posessed, .she lost her reason.
    Tiamat uttered wild, piercing cries,
    She trembled and shook to her very foundations.
    She recited an incantation, she pronounced her spell,
    And the gods of the battle cried out for their weapons.
    Then advanced Tiamat and Marduk, the counselor of the gods;
    To the fight they came on, to the battle they drew nigh.
    The lord spread out his net and caught her,
    And the evil wind that was behind him he let loose in her face.
    As Tiamat opened her mouth to its full extent,
    He drove in the evil wind, while as yet she had not shut her lips.
    The terrible winds filled her belly,
    And her courage was taken from her, and her mouth she opened wide.
    He seized the spear and burst her belly,
    He severed her inward parts, he pierced her heart.
    He overcame her and cut off her life;
    He cast down her body and stood upon it.
    When he had slain Tiamat, the leader,
    Her might was broken, her host was scattered.
    And the gods her helpers, who marched by her side,
    Trembled, and were afraid, and turned back.
    They took to flight to save their lives;
    But they were surrounded, so that they could not escape.
    He took them captive, he broke their weapons;
    In the net they were caught and in the snare they sat down.
    The ... of the world they filled with cries of grief.
    They received punishment from him, they were held in bondage.
    And on the eleven creatures which she had filled with the power of striking terror,
    Upon the troop of devils, who marched at her...,
    He brought affliction, their strength he...;
    Them and their opposition he trampled under his feet.
    Moreover, Kingu, who had been exalted over them,
    He conquered, and with the god Dug-ga he counted him.
    He took from him the Tablets of Destiny that were not rightly his,
    He sealed them with a seal and in his own breast he laid them.
    Now after the hero Marduk had conquered and cast down his enemies,
    And had made the arrogant foe even like
    And had fully established Ansar's triumph over the enemy
    And had attained the purpose of Nudimmud,
    Over the captive gods he strengthened his durance,
    And unto Tiamat, whom he had conquered, he returned.
    And the lord stood upon Tiamat's hinder parts,
    And with his merciless club he smashed her skull.
    He cut through the channels of her blood,
    And he made the North wind bear it away into secret places.
    His fathers beheld, and they rejoiced and were glad;
    Presents and gifts they brought unto him.
    Then the lord rested, gazing upon her dead body,
    While he divided the flesh of the ... , and devised a cunning plan.
    He split her up like a flat fish into two halves;
    One half of her he stablished as a covering for heaven.
    He fixed a bolt, he stationed a watchman,
    And bade them not to let her waters come forth.
    He passed through the heavens, he surveyed the regions thereof,
    And over against the Deep he set the dwelling of Nudimmud.
    And the lord measured the structure of the Deep,
    And he founded E-sara, a mansion like unto it.
    The mansion E-sara which he created as heaven,
    He caused Anu, Bel, and Ea in their districts to inhabit.
    THE FIFTH TABLET
    He (Marduk) made the stations for the great gods;
    The stars, their images, as the stars of the Zodiac, he fixed.
    He ordained the year and into sections he divided it;
    For the twelve months he fixed three stars.
    After he had ... the days of the year ... images,
    He founded the station of Nibir [the planet Jupiter] to determine their bounds;
    That none might err or go astray,
    He set the station of Bel and Ea along with him.
    He opened great gates on both sides,
    He made strong the bolt on the left and on the right.
    In the midst thereof he fixed the zenith;
    The Moon-god he caused to shine forth, the night he entrusted to him.
    He appointed him, a being of the night, to determine the days;
    Every month without ceasing with the crown he covered him, saying:
    "At the beginning of the month, when thou shinest upon the land,
    Thou commandest the horns to determine six days,
    And on the seventh day to divide the crown.
    On the fourteenth day thou shalt stand opposite, the half....
    When the Sun-god on the foundation of heaven...thee,
    The ... thou shalt cause to ..., and thou shalt make his...
    ... unto the path of the Sun-god shalt thou cause to draw nigh,
    And on the ... day thou shalt stand opposite, and the Sun-god shall...
    ... to traverse her way.
    ... thou shalt cause to draw nigh, and thou shalt judge the right.
    ... to destroy..."
    The gods, his fathers, beheld the net which he had made,
    They beheld the bow and how its work was accomplished.
    They praised the work which he had done...
    Then Anu raised the ... in the assembly of the gods. He kissed the bow, saving, " It is...!"
    And thus he named the names of the bow, saving,
    "'Long-wood' shall be one name, and the second name shall be ...,
    And its third name shall be the Bow-star, in heaven shall it...!"
    Then he fixed a station for it...
    Now after the fate of...
    He set a throne...
    ...in heaven...
    THE SIXTH TABLET
    When Marduk heard the word of the gods,
    His heart prompted him and he devised a cunning plan.
    He opened his mouth and unto Ea he spake
    That which he had conceived in his heart he imparted unto him:
    "My blood will I take and bone will I fashion
    I will make man, that man may
    I will create man who shall inhabit the earth,
    That the service of the gods may be established, and that their shrines may be built.
    But I will alter the ways of the gods, and I will change their paths;
    Together shall they be oppressed and unto evil shall they....
    And Ea answered him and spake the word:
    "... the ... of the gods I have changed
    ... and one...
    ... shall be destroyed and men will I...
    ... and the gods .
    ... and they..."
    They rejoiced...
    In Upsukkinnaku they set their dwelling.
    Of the heroic son, their avenger, they cried:
    " We, whom he succored.... !"
    They seated themselves and in the assembly they named him...,
    They all cried aloud, they exalted him...
    THE SEVENTH TABLET
    O Asari, [Marduk] "Bestower of planting," "Founder of sowing"
    "Creator of grain and plants," "who caused the green herb to spring up!"
    O Asaru-alim, [Mardk] "who is revered in the house of counsel," "who aboundeth in counsel,"
    The gods paid homage, fear took hold upon them!
    O Asaru-alim-nuna, [Marduk] "the mighty one," "the Light of the father who begat him,"
    "Who directeth the decrees of Anu Bel, and Ea!"
    He was their patron, be ordained their...;
    He, whose provision is abundance, goeth forth...
    Tutu [Marduk] is "He who created them anew";
    Should their wants be pure, then are they satisfied;
    Should he make an incantation, then are the gods appeased;
    Should they attack him in anger, he withstandeth their onslaught!
    Let him therefore be exalted, and in the assembly of the gods let him... ;
    None among the gods can rival him!
    Tutu [Marduk] is Zi-ukkina, "the Life of the host of the gods,"
    Who established for the gods the bright heavens.
    He set them on their way, and ordained their path;
    Never shall his ... deeds be forgotten among men.
    Tutu as Zi-azag thirdly they named, "the Bringer of Purification,"
    "The God of the Favoring Breeze," "the Lord of Hearing and Mercy,"
    "The Creator of Fulness and Abundance," " the Founder of Plenteousness,"
    "Who increaseth all that is small."
    In sore distress we felt his favoring breeze,"
    Let them say, let them pay reverence, let them bow in humility before him!
    Tutu as Aga-azag may mankind fourthly magnify!
    "The Lord of the Pure Incantation," " the Quickener of the Dead,"
    "Who had mercy upon the captive gods,"
    "Who removed the yoke from upon the gods his enemies,"
    "For their forgiveness did he create mankind,"
    "The Merciful One, with whom it is to bestow life!"
    May his deeds endure, may they never be forgotten ,
    In the mouth of mankind whom his hands have made!
    Tutu as Mu-azag, fifthly, his "Pure incantation" may their mouth proclaim,
    Who through his Pure Incantation hath destroyed all the evil ones!"
    Sag-zu, [Marduk] "who knoweth the heart of the gods," " who seeth through the innermost part!"
    "The evil-doer he hath not caused to go forth with him!"
    "Founder of the assembly of the gods," who ... their heart!"
    "Subduer of the disobedient," "...!"
    "Director of Righteousness," "...,"
    " Who rebellion and...!"
    Tutu as Zi-si, "the ...,"
    "Who put an end to anger," "who...!"
    Tutu as Suh-kur, thirdly, "the Destroyer of the foe,"
    "Who put their plans to confusion,"
    "Who destroyed all the wicked," "...,"
    ... let them... !
    who...
    He named the four quarters of the world, mankind hecreated,
    And upon him understanding...
    "The mighty one...!"
    Agil...
    "The Creator of the earth...!"
    Zulummu... .
    "The Giver of counsel and of whatsoever...!"
    Mummu, " the Creator of...!"
    Mulil, the heavens...,
    "Who for...!"
    Giskul, let...,
    "Who brought the gods to naught....!"
    ... " the Chief of all lords,"
    ... supreme is his might!
    Lugal-durmah, "the King of the band of the gods," " the Lord of rulers."
    "Who is exalted in a royal habitation,"
    "Who among the gods is gloriously supreme!
    Adu-nuna, " the Counselor of Ea," who created the gods his fathers,
    Unto the path of whose majesty
    No god can ever attain!
    ... in Dul-azag be made it known,
    ... pure is his dwelling!
    ... the... of those without understanding is Lugaldul-azaga!
    ... supreme is his might!
    ... their... in the midst of Tiamat,
    ... of the battle!
    ... the star, which shineth in the heavens.
    May he hold the Beginning and the Future, may they pay homage unto him,
    Saying, "He who forced his way through the midst of Tiamat without resting,
    Let his name be Nibiru, 'the Seizer of the Midst'!
    For the stars of heaven he upheld the paths,
    He shepherded all the gods like sheep!
    He conquered Tiamat, he troubled and ended her life,"
    In the future of mankind, when the days grow old,
    May this be heard without ceasing; may it hold sway forever!
    Since he created the realm of heaven and fashioned the firm earth,
    The Lord of the World," the father Bel hath called his name.
    This title, which all the Spirits of Heaven proclaimed,
    Did Ea hear, and his spirit was rejoiced, and he said:
    "He whose name his fathers have made glorious,
    Shall be even as I, his name shall be Ea!
    The binding of all my decrees shall he control,
    All my commands shall he make known! "
    By the name of "Fifty " did the great gods
    Proclaim his fifty names, they, made his path preeminent.

  3. #3
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    Furthermore....



    Asian Mongols
    There are many Mongol creation myths. In the most ancient one, the creation of the world is attributed to a Buddhist deity Lama. At the start of time there was only water, and from the heavens Lama came down to it holding an iron rod from which he began to stir. As he began to stir the water, the stirring brought about a wind and fire which caused a thickening at the center of the waters to form the earth. Another narrative also attributes the creation of heaven and earth to a lama who is called Udan. Udan began by separating earth from heaven, and then dividing heaven and earth both into nine stories, and creating nine rivers. After the creation of the earth itself, the first male and female couple were created out of clay. They would become the progenitors of all humanity.

    In another example the world began as an agitating gas which grew increasingly warm and damp, precipitating a heavy rain that created the oceans. Dust and sand emerged to the surface and became earth. Yet another account tells of the Buddha Sakyamuni searching the surface of the sea for a means to create the earth and spotted a golden frog. From its east side, Buddha pierced the frog through, causing it to spin and face north. From its mouth burst fire and from its rump streamed water. Buddha tossed golden sand on his back which became land. And this was the origin of the five earthly elements, wood and metal from the arrow, and fire, water and sand


    African Fons
    Various versions of the creation story are told. In most the creator is either Mawu, the moon being and mother of all the gods and humanity, or Mawu-Lisa, the sun/moon being who is both male and female. In others, Nana Buluku is the ultimate creator, an androgynous deity who gave birth to the female Mawu and the male Lisa and passed the power over creation to them.

    Many of the creation accounts tell of Mawu creating everything as she was carried from place to place on the back or in the mouth of Aido Hwedo, the rainbow serpent. The earth was created first, its curves, slopes and rises shaped by the winding, snaking motions of Aido Hwedo. Mountains formed from Aido Hwedo's excrement wherever they stopped to rest, leaving precious minerals inside. When Mawu finished, all of the mountains, trees, elephants and other creations left world too heavy, so she asked Aido Hwedo to coil, to encircle the earth and rest underneath to support its weight.

    Aido Hwedo holds his own tail in his mouth to hold fast to the earth, and rests in the cool of the seas which Mawu made for him to protect him from the heat. Mawu's son, Agbe, now commands them. Whenever Aido Hwedo shifts or readjusts his position, he causes an earthquake or tidal wave.


    Siberians
    The Tungusic creation myths are traditional stories of the creation of the world belonging to the Tungusic peoples of Siberia. In one well known version the story begins when nothing exists but a vast primordial ocean. Buga, their central deity, set fire to this water, and following a long struggle the flames consumed much of the water, exposing dry, hard land. Then Buga created the light and separated it from darkness, and descended to the newly created land. There he confronted Buninka, the devil, and a dispute arose between them over who had created the world. Buninka was spiteful and tried to injure Buga's creation. He broke Buga's twelve-stringed lyre, and Buga angrily challenged Buninka to make a fir tree and raise it to stand fast and firm in the middle of the sea. Buga agreed he would bow to Buninka's powers if he could do so, but if he failed then Buga would subject himself to the same challenge. If Buga were then to succeed, Buninka must concede to Buga that he was the most powerful creator.

    Buninka agreed to the challenge and commanded a fir tree to rise from the sea. The tree grew, but it was weak and bobbed to and fro. Buga then created a second tree but it thrived and grew into a stately tree. Buninka was forced to acknowledge Buga's greater power and bowed in homage. Buga put his hand to Buninka's head and turned it to iron. This caused so much pain in Buninka that he begged Buga for release, and Buga relented—Buninka was then allowed to roam the earth.

    Buga collected materials to make mankind. From the east he gathered iron; from the south fire; the west, water; and from the north, earth. From the earth he made flesh and bone; from the iron he made heart; from the water he made blood; and from the fire he gave them vitality, and thus he made two beings, a man and a woman. Buninka was strictly forbidden to do mankind any injury, but after they had increased in numbers, he wanted to claim half as his own. Buga refused to give him any of the living but Buninka was granted the vicious men and women after they had died, Buga keeping the virtuous to himself. So after death, the evil join Buninka in hell, which is in the center of the earth, where they are punished.


    The Egyptians
    The ancient Egyptians had many creator gods and associated legends. Thus the world or more specifically Egypt was created in diverse ways according to different parts of the country.

    In all of these myths, the world was said to have emerged from an infinite, lifeless sea when the sun rose for the first time, in a distant period known as zp tpj (sometimes transcribed as Zep Tepi), "the first occasion". Different myths attributed the creation to different gods: the set of eight primordial deities called the Ogdoad, the self-engendered god Atum and his offspring, the contemplative deity Ptah, and the mysterious, transcendent god Amun. While these differing cosmogonies competed to some extent, in other ways they were complementary, as different aspects of the Egyptian understanding of creation.

    The different creation myths have some elements in common. They all held that the world had arisen out of the lifeless waters of chaos, called Nu. They also included a pyramid-shaped mound, called the benben, which was the first thing to emerge from the waters. These elements were likely inspired by the flooding of the Nile River each year; the receding floodwaters left fertile soil in their wake, and the Egyptians may have equated this with the emergence of life from the primeval chaos. The imagery of the pyramidal mound derived from the highest mounds of earth emerging as the river receded.

    The sun was also closely associated with creation, and it was said to have first risen from the mound, as the general sun-god Ra or as the god Khepri, who represented the newly-risen sun. There were many versions of the sun's emergence, and it was said to have emerged directly from the mound or from a lotus flower that grew from the mound, in the form of a heron, falcon, scarab beetle, or human child.

    Another common element of Egyptian cosmogonies is the familiar figure of the cosmic egg, a substitute for the primeval waters or the primeval mound. One variant of the cosmic egg version teaches that the sun god, as primeval power, emerged from the primeval mound, which itself stood in the chaos of the primeval sea.



    ...Noticing any similarities?

  4. #4
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    Thanks Schmuldvich for all the quotes. I'll have to examine them later as I need to be at work in a bit. Some of the NAMES in the ancient texts are of particular interest, and remember that philosophers like Socrates and Plato often referenced the gods and their stories. When we speak of "the wise words of the philosophers," it's important to remember that little detail.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    Thanks Schmuldvich for all the quotes. I'll have to examine them later as I need to be at work in a bit. Some of the NAMES in the ancient texts are of particular interest, and remember that philosophers like Socrates and Plato often referenced the gods and their stories. When we speak of "the wise words of the philosophers," it's important to remember that little detail.
    One of the best ways to deliver Truth to those not quiet able to understand is via myth/fable/story.

    These stories get passed down generation to generation unbeknownst to only but a few that what is being handed down is bigger than meets the eye.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for composing this.

  7. #7
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    Indeed Schmuldvich, thank you for all the stories. I was finally reading through them last night. I'll add these here. The first two taken from Wiki, and the third from a site I posted about on another thread regarding Native American mythologies.

    AZTEC

    Because the Aztec adopted and combined several traditions with their own earlier traditions, they had several creation myths. One of these, the Five Suns describes four great ages preceding the present world, each of which ended in a catastrophe, and "were named in function of the force or divine element that violently put an end to each one of them".[2] Coatlicue was the mother of Centzon Huitznahua ("Four Hundred Southerners"), her sons, and Coyolxauhqui, her daughter. She found a ball filled with feathers and placed it in her waistband, becoming pregnant with Huitzilopochtli. Her other children became suspicious as to the identity of the father and vowed to kill their mother. She gave birth on Mount Coatepec, pursued by her children, but the newborn Huitzilopochtli defeated most of his brothers, who became the stars. He also killed his half-sister Coyolxauhqui by tearing out her heart using a Xiuhcoatl (a blue snake) and throwing her body down the mountain. This was said to inspire the Aztecs to rip the hearts out of their victims and throw their bodies down the sides of the temple dedicated to Huitzilopochtli, who represents the sun chasing away the stars at dawn.

    Our age (Nahui-Ollin), the fifth age, or fifth creation, began in the ancient city of Teotihuacan[citation needed]. According to the myth, all the gods had gathered to sacrifice themselves and create a new age. Although the world and the sun had already been created, it would only be through their sacrifice that the sun would be set into motion and time as well as history could begin. The most handsome and strongest of the gods, Tecuciztecatl, was supposed to sacrifice himself but when it came time to self-immolate, he could not jump into the fire. Instead, Nanahuatl the smallest and humblest of the gods, who was also covered in boils, sacrificed himself first and jumped into the flames. The sun was set into motion with his sacrifice and time began. Humiliated by Nanahuatl's sacrifice, Tecuciztecatl too leaped into the fire and became the moon.[3]
    MAYA

    Creation and end of the world

    The Popol Vuh describes the creation of the earth by the wind of the sea and sky, as well as its sequel. The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel relates the collapse of the sky and the deluge, followed by the raising of the sky and the erection of the five World Trees.[1] The Lacandons also knew the tale of the creation of the Underworld.[2]
    Creation of Mankind

    The Popol Vuh gives a sequence of four efforts at creation: First were animals, then wet clay, wood, then last, the creation of the first ancestors from maize dough. To this, the Lacandons add the creation of the main kin groupings and their 'totemic' animals.[3] The creation of humankind is concluded by the Mesoamerican tale of the opening of the Maize (or Sustenance) Mountain by the Lightning deities.[4]
    Actions of the heroes: Arranging the world

    The best-known hero myth is about the defeat of a bird demon and of the deities of disease and death by the Hero Twins, Hunahpu and Xbalanque. Of equal importance is the parallel narrative of a maize hero defeating the deities of Thunder and Lightning and establishing a pact with them.[5] Although its present spread is confined to the Gulf Coast areas, various data suggest that this myth was once a part of Mayan oral tradition as well. Important mythological fragments about the heroic reduction of the jaguars have been preserved by the Tzotziles.[6]
    Marriage with the Earth

    This mythological type defines the relation between mankind and the game and crops. An ancestral hero - Xbalanque in a Kekchi tradition - changes into a hummingbird to woo the daughter of an Earth God; the hero's wife is finally transformed into game, bees, snakes and insects, or the maize. If the hero gets the upper hand, he becomes the Sun, his wife the Moon.[7] A moralistic Tzotzil version has a man rewarded with a daughter of the Rain Deity, only to get divorced and lose her again.[8]
    Origin of Sun and Moon
    The origin of Sun and Moon is not always the outcome of a Marriage with the Earth. From Chiapas and the western Guatemalan Highlands comes the tale of Younger Brother and his jealous Elder Brethren: Youngest One becomes the Sun, his mother becomes the Moon, and the Elder Brethren are transformed into wild pigs and other forest animals.[9] In a comparable way, the Elder Brethren of the Popol Vuh Twin myth are transformed into monkeys, with their younger brothers becoming Sun and Moon.
    One day when Nanabozho returned to his lodge after a long journey, he missed his young cousin who lived with him. He called the cousin's name but heard no answer. Looking around on the sand for tracks, Nanabozho was startled by the trail of the Great Serpent. He then knew that his cousin had been seized by his enemy.

    Nanabozho picked up his bow and arrows and followed the track of the serpent. He passed the great river, climbed mountains, and crossed over valleys until he came to the shores of a deep and gloomy lake. It is now called Manitou Lake, Spirit Lake, and also the Lake of Devils. The trail of the Great Serpent led to the edge of the water.

    Nanabozho could see, at the bottom of the lake, the house of the Great Serpent. It was filled with evil spirits, who were his servants and his companions. Their forms were monstrous and terrible. Most of them, like their master, resembled spirits. In the centre of this horrible group was the Great Serpent himself, coiling his terrifying length around the cousin of Nanabozho.

    The head of the Serpent was red as blood. His fierce eyes glowed like fire. His entire body was armed with hard and glistening scales of every color and shade.

    Looking down on these twisting spirits of evil, Nanabozho made up his mind that he would get revenge on them for the death of his cousin.

    He said to the clouds, "Disappear!"

    And the clouds went out of sight.

    "Winds, be still at once!" And the winds became still.

    When the air over the lake of evil spirits had become stagnant, Nanabozho said to the sun, "Shine over the lake with all the fierceness you can. Make the water boil."

    In these ways, thought Nanabozho, he would force the Great Serpent to seek the cool shade of the trees growing on the shores of the lake. There he would seize the enemy and get revenge.

    After giving his orders, Nanabozho took his bow and arrows and placed himself near the spot where he thought the serpents would come to enjoy the shade. Then he changed himself into the broken stump of a withered tree.

    The winds became still, the air stagnant, and the sun shot hot rays from a cloudless sky. In time, the water of the lake became troubled, and bubbles rose to the surface. The rays of the sun had penetrated to the home of the serpents. As the water bubbled and foamed, a serpent lifted his head above the centre of the lake and gazed around the shores. Soon another serpent came to the surface. Both listened for the footsteps of Nanabozho, but they heard him nowhere.

    "Nanabozho is sleeping," they said to one another.

    And then they plunged beneath the waters, which seemed to hiss as they closed over the evil spirits.

    Not long after, the lake became more troubled. Its water boiled from its very depths, and the hot waves dashed wildly against the rocks on its banks. Soon the Great Serpent came slowly to the surface of the water and moved toward the shore. His blood-red crest glowed. The reflection from his scales was blinding--as blinding as the glitter of a sleet-covered forest beneath the winter sun. He was followed by all the evil spirits. So great was their number that they soon covered the shores of the lake.

    When they saw the broken stump of the withered tree, they suspected that it might be one of the disguises of Nanabozho. They knew his cunning. One of the serpents approached the stump, wound his tail around it, and tried to drag it down into the lake. Nanabozho could hardly keep from crying aloud, for the tail of the monster prickled his sides. But he stood firm and was silent.

    The evil spirits moved on. The Great Serpent glided into the forest and wound his many coils around the trees. His companions also found shade--all but one. One remained near the shore to listen for the footsteps of Nanabozho.

    From the stump, Nanabozho watched until all the serpents were asleep and the guard was intently looking in another direction. Then he silently drew an arrow from his quiver, placed it in his bow, and aimed it at the heart of the Great Serpent. It reached its mark. With a howl that shook the mountains and startled the wild beasts in their caves, the monster awoke. Followed by its terrified companions, which also were howling with rage and terror, the Great Serpent plunged into the water.

    At the bottom of the lake there still lay the body of Nanabozho's cousin. In their fury the serpents tore it into a thousand pieces. His shredded lungs rose to the surface and covered the lake with whiteness.

    The Great Serpent soon knew that he would die from his wound, but he and his companions were determined to destroy Nanabozho. They caused the water of the lake to swell upward and to pound against the shore with the sound of many thunders. Madly the flood rolled over the land, over the tracks of Nanabozho, carrying with it rocks and trees. High on the crest of the highest wave floated the wounded Great Serpent. His eyes glared around him, and his hot breath mingled with the hot breath of his many companions.

    Nanabozho, fleeing before the angry waters, thought of his Indian children. He ran through their villages, shouting, "Run to the mountaintops! The Great Serpent is angry and is flooding the earth! Run! Run!"

    The people caught up their children and found safety on the mountains. Nanabozho continued his flight along the base of the western hills and then up a high mountain beyond Lake Superior, far to the north. There he found many men and animals that had escaped from the flood that was already covering the valleys and plains and even the highest hills. Still the waters continued to rise. Soon all the mountains were under the flood, except the high one on which stood Nanabozho.

    There he gathered together timber and made a raft. Upon it the men and women and animals with him placed themselves. Almost immediately the mountaintop disappeared from their view, and they floated along on the face of the waters. For many days they floated. At long last, the flood began to subside. Soon the people on the raft saw the trees on the tops of the mountains. Then they saw the mountains and hills, then the plains and the valleys.

    When the water disappeared from the land, the people who survived learned that the Great Serpent was dead and that his companions had returned to the bottom of the lake of spirits. There they remain to this day. For fear of Nanabozho, they have never dared to come forth again.
    It's interesting to note that in Native American lore, the serpent is almost always depicted with feathers, and birds tend to be the predominate animal of study in legend, rather than lions and dragons. Different strokes for different continents.

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