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Thread: Does this look ok? Ens Tincture with a different herb

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    As far as I know, in this ens process you will pull off a clear (as in transparent) fluid as opposed to an opaque one. The yellow coloring could either be indicative of a low strength "reddish," or it could be from using flower petals. There's a specific process that causes leaves to turn yellow and red, which isn't found in flower petals. The "red oil" that the ens process produces in the melissa ens is probably related to that process, as it "putrefies" in the angel water, and the red is then extracted into the alcohol. Either way, you should arrive at the proper product for your ingredient. I say let it go a while longer though, and keep track of changes, since you are in new territory.

    Even a full tincture in my case never "darkened" like a normal tincture from a hibiscus flower. Yellow might be what you are after here.

    Is this lotus a dangerous one, or generally safe in its natural state?
    In its natural state its generally safe, anyways, here's how it looks now almost after 1 week. Do I need to keep letting it macerate or I have to extract this one and pour another certain amount in?

    The sediments you see in the yellow layer are not really part of it but became stuck on the glass I think:



    One article says to pour about 1 to 2 inches and extract each couple of days but the 'real alchemy' book says:

    "Place about two ounces of finely ground herb in a clean, dry jar and pour in the clear fluid you have collected and filtered. Beginning this operation when the planet ruling the herb is in a powerful position will assist you in your Work. Pour in enough fluid to cover the top of the herb until it becomes a fully liquefied mass. Also allow space for thorough shaking, and seal with a tight plastic lid.

    Digest for a week or two with periodic shaking. The liquid will become darkly colored during this time. Carefully squeeze the mixture through a nylon stocking and place the liquid into a clean vessel. Remember to use gloves and eye protection for this.

    Now pour in an equal amount of strong alcohol (at least 95%) and shake daily to insure the two liquids mix, as the lighter alcohol will float on top. If the two liquids do not separate, it means there was too much water in the herb or the alcohol. Slowly add solid dry potassium carbonate to absorb the excess water. If separation does not occur, you will have to start again.

    The alcohol extract floating on top will be the Ens Tincture that will be removed after the digestion. The alcohol will become darkly tinted after a few days. After about two weeks (or longer) you can carefully draw off the alcohol tincture from the top of the Oil of Tartar / herb layer. Allow it to stand for a day or two then filter for use.

    It is helpful to let it stand in a freezer during this time, so that any water containing dissolved potassium carbonate will tend to crystallize out more easily. You will want to get the best separation of the two liquids as possible. Remember to save the Oil of Tartar for future use. It can be dried, calcined and used again.

    In general, five to ten drops of the Ens Tincture is taken in a glass of wine or water on the day ruled by the planet of the herb. It will have an effect on the subtle or astral body of the user, as well as enhanced medicinal qualities of the particular plant. Take note of both physical effects and how it affects your habitual thought and emotional patterns."
    Last edited by KnowledgeSeeker; 2 Days Ago at 11:21 AM.

  2. #12
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    It's always hard to tell from an image. Like for instance, if that is a third substance floating on top, or simply a meniscus. You gotta go with your gut. You could pipette a little of the alcohol to experiment with and try a few drops in water or wine, then note your results (check for subtle changes in your feelings, daily outlook, etc as well). My strategy on maceration is essentially to go as long as I feel like waiting. Even simple macerations I will let run for weeks to months unless I'm making the tincture for somewhat immediate use, in which case I'll strain them once they look black in a mason jar.

    Does the book say anything about the KCO3 part going clear before separating them?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    It's always hard to tell from an image. Like for instance, if that is a third substance floating on top, or simply a meniscus. You gotta go with your gut. You could pipette a little of the alcohol to experiment with and try a few drops in water or wine, then note your results (check for subtle changes in your feelings, daily outlook, etc as well). My strategy on maceration is essentially to go as long as I feel like waiting. Even simple macerations I will let run for weeks to months unless I'm making the tincture for somewhat immediate use, in which case I'll strain them once they look black in a mason jar.

    Does the book say anything about the KCO3 part going clear before separating them?
    A different source says:

    "The alcohol is decanted and preserved and a fresh alcohol is poured on the saturated tartar water. This step is repeated until all colouring essence is absorbed by the alcohol. A single proper dose of alcohol may do the job, but this is of course a matter of experience."

    https://innergarden.org/en/ens.html

    The thing at the top looks to be a reflection I think if you mean the 'brown looking bit'. When I gaze from below up diagonally the surface looks some what clear?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KnowledgeSeeker View Post
    A different source says:

    "The alcohol is decanted and preserved and a fresh alcohol is poured on the saturated tartar water. This step is repeated until all colouring essence is absorbed by the alcohol. A single proper dose of alcohol may do the job, but this is of course a matter of experience."

    https://innergarden.org/en/ens.html

    The thing at the top looks to be a reflection I think if you mean the 'brown looking bit'. When I gaze from below up diagonally the surface looks some what clear?
    That's something like I remember. I don't have the book but I've read many excerpts online. Maybe it just means until the alcohol stops taking on color, but for some reason in my head it was insinuating that the tarter section should whiten up.

    As to the second part. Just clarifying that pictures don't always convey everything we would like them to. Faint, cloudy precipitates, for example, rarely show up at all except with a good camera and proper lighting conditions. My phone pictures always come out a bit off. I can get better shots with the mirrorless Sony, but that also means a bit more work and trouble.

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