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Thread: Indigenous people

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    Indigenous people

    I just got back from spending a week with the Kichwa people of Sarayaku (in Ecuador). As always I am reminded, everytime I hang with indigenous communities, how "right" they are... and how "wrong" our modern civil(?)ization is.

    I am aware that some may throw the term "nobel savage" at me, and you might be right (in your dreams)... however based on my own experience with indigenous communities in Central Africa, Peru, Ecuador, Panama, North of Sweden and the United States the concept of "the nobel savage" is correct.

    For the clueless: A noble savage is a literary stock character who embodies the concept of the indigenous, outsider, wild human, an "other" who has not been "corrupted" by civilization, and therefore symbolizes humanity's innate goodness. - source

    Also the more time I spend with them I am convinced they are the true magicians and alchemists. And no, I did not partake in any psychedelic medicine this time... although I did hang with a few shamans.

    At one point a delegation of indigenous leaders presented a declaration of rights (that includes the rights of Nature since they see Nature and Humans as equally valuable) to the political leaders of Ecuador. This document was presented by the main Chief and Shaman (an old man of at least 90 years).

    Right before he presented the document he performed a shamanic ritual with tobacco and some sacred songs (not sure the Kichwa call them Icaros). I later found out that this Chief Shaman was completly drenched in Ayahuasca during this formal meeting with the leaders of Ecuador. They don't play around. LOL.

    Every morning I sat with the women as they prepared food for me and it brought me back... I forgot how wonderful life is in these indigenous communities, if only the fucking governments and corporations would just leave them alone. There is always a certain vibe around these people. Something that is hard to put into words.

    There is a calm soothing vibe. Relaxed. No problem to sit in a group in silence. Or simply laugh. They laugh a lot. They are also so beautiful. The men, the women, the elders... and the children. Adorable. They are always friendly, and greet with open arms. Always with a smile. And they know about the plants and about Nature. They speak to it, and it speaks back.

    Only direct experience can do it justice... but if anyone reading this ever get the chance to spend time in an indigneous community: take it


    My amigo Yaku singing about his home, Sarayaku.

    Last edited by Awani; 08-01-2018 at 04:55 PM.
    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    As always I am reminded, everytime I hang with indigenous communities, how "right" they are... and how "wrong" our modern civil(?)ization is.


    GIVE US MORE



    AND MORE



    AND MORE



    There is a calm soothing vibe. Relaxed. No problem to sit in a group in silence. Or simply laugh. They laugh a lot. They are also so beautiful. The men, the women, the elders... and the children. Adorable. They are always friendly, and greet with open arms. Always with a smile. And they know about the plants and about Nature. They speak to it, and it speaks back.
    Sounds nice, i find football is a common universal language for bonding, play any football ?

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    I guess that is partially true, however that usually leaves out 50 % (the women)... so music and dance is far greater... that is the true universal language.

    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    Equator is an interesting place in general. I've been in the rainforests, but always on an oil rig. Our buses did pick up and drop off natives, but I didn't get to talk to any of them. Even places like Coca that aren't indigenous but are definitely not developed by modern US standards, there's something to be learned from everywhere you go. Did you take the Rio Napa from Quito into the forest? It was my understanding that was a limited access area. Then again, the natives didn't need passports to travel back and forth.

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    It would be advised to have an invitation. The major issue, if condensed, is the word you used: development.

    As for the oil, well that is the thing the indigenous are fighting... that and fossil fuel companies and more. Sounds to me you work on, or for, the "enemy"... I have worked 6 years, and the indigenous in Ecuador for 25 years... to stop and fight the oil companies in the region. Knowingly or not you have taken part in the machine that not only ignores human rights for the indigenous, but also pollutes and destroys the rainforest... if what you say is true...

    I've been in the rainforest, but always on an oil rig. To me that sentence reads like this:

    I've had sex, but always with animals.

    I've been to the USA, but only in VR.


    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Awani View Post
    It would be advised to have an invitation. The major issue, if condensed, is the word you used: development.

    As for the oil, well that is the thing the indigenous are fighting... that and fossil fuel companies and more. Sounds to me you work on, or for, the "enemy"... I have worked 6 years, and the indigenous in Ecuador for 25 years... to stop and fight the oil companies in the region. Knowingly or not you have taken part in the machine that not only ignores human rights for the indigenous, but also pollutes and destroys the rainforest... if what you say is true...

    I've been in the rainforest, but always on an oil rig. To me that sentence reads like this:

    I've had sex, but always with animals.

    I've been to the USA, but only in VR.


    All the oil companies in Ecuador, or more specifically, the drilling sites, are government run. While I understand that most here would automatically assume oil drillers to be "the enemy" in a lot of situations, I have no reservations about my job in the field (which I no longer have). We're all using computers that are made from oil products right this instant. :P

    Conservation and minimal footprint were a huge part of the mitigation effort, especially in Ecuador. But we live in a world fueled by petroleum. Nobody ever seemed to have a problem with a "free ride" to Quito.

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    That logic is severely flawed, and "minimal footprint etc" is a fucking joke. They are NOT government run. Those corporations OWN the government. Who made it a world fuelled by Petroleum? Your fellow country men, that's who... together with those hypocrites of Jews and those "friends" in Saudi Arabia. Those three countries: Axis of Evil. IMO.

    I know the people hurt, and the indigenous have a real life and death problem with these oil companies - in fact ESPECIALLY in Ecuador.

    Which company did you work for? I certainly hope it was not Chevron or Shell.

    Last edited by Awani; 08-02-2018 at 08:04 AM.
    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    I was with a third party taking scientific measurements from the wellbore. I thought there was only really one company drilling down there, and it was specific to south america, maybe Petrobras (but I think they are in Brazil)? Can't recall who was doing the contracting for us. There was another smaller one, can't remember their name either.

    Who made it a world fuelled by Petroleum?
    The same people that perpetuate it. All of us, with our disposable plastics and our sterile environments and dependence on energy and gasoline. Our collective worldwide economy that insists on next-day air shipping. Our consistent inadequacy with all of the luxuries we take for granted. This isn't exactly a new problem, it's been going on since someone in Titus, PA figured out how to replace whale oil for lamps.

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    One? No, far from it. There are a lot of oil companies.

    True, everyone is complicit... but the least complicit - and the ones who has to suffer the most from all this - is the indigenous... and ironically we'd all be better off living like they used to do. IMO.

    But to be fair it was American Oil Men that made sure the world got addicted to oil, there have always been better alternatives and better routes to take. For example how "hemp" was pushed out in order to push in "paper from trees", only because the rich paper makers owned more trees than hemp. And on it goes.

    So yes we are all guilty of usage, but also there are a select few who "pushed" this on us... Rich American Jews. It doesn't really matter that they are Jewish, I just like to mention that most of them were because it pisses of the ADL that believe a Jew can't be evil. Of course they can, the same Rich American Jews helped finance the Nazi War Machine. But I digress.

    Donít let the delusion of reality confuse you regarding the reality of the illusion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Awani View Post
    One? No, far from it. There are a lot of oil companies.

    True, everyone is complicit... but the least complicit - and the ones who has to suffer the most from all this - is the indigenous... and ironically we'd all be better off living like they used to do. IMO.

    But to be fair it was American Oil Men that made sure the world got addicted to oil, there have always been better alternatives and better routes to take. For example how "hemp" was pushed out in order to push in "paper from trees", only because the rich paper makers owned more trees than hemp. And on it goes.

    So yes we are all guilty of usage, but also there are a select few who "pushed" this on us... Rich American Jews. It doesn't really matter that they are Jewish, I just like to mention that most of them were because it pisses of the ADL that believe a Jew can't be evil. Of course they can, the same Rich American Jews helped finance the Nazi War Machine. But I digress.

    I think we're on the same page, but we're looking at similar things through slightly different spectacles. Rockefeller almost had alcohol outlawed forever simply to make gasoline the dominate fuel for motor vehicles. A lot of those pioneering businessmen manipulated the media and so-called righteous causes (Mothers against drinking, in the above scenario being the principal lobby group). They do this to push their agenda and fortune. True enough. I've seen oil companies influence legal matters directly, so believe me when I say I don't need to be lectured on that topic, lol. When BOEM rewrote the "rule book" for offshore drilling, those new "laws" were actually practices already in place by several of the big oil companies. Some of them practices that smaller companies can't always afford. Result, nothing (literally) changed in drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, but smaller companies got beat back a bit, companies that the bigger ones sometimes use for turnkey operations when there's a hole that needs to be drilled outside of their own standards of practice (been on those rigs too).

    I never liked working for Shell or BP, not because of anything the public knows about, I just hate their company policies, and I think they have some backward ass internal regulations that contradict each other, and they don't have a solid safety culture in place.

    My favorite rig might shock you, as the DDS wasn't 30 miles from Macondo when the Deepwater Horizon blew up. We sent support ships to help out. The DDS was a TransOcean drillship, and the client was Chevron. Two companies you would probably associate with evil in one way or another, but everyone on that ship from the company man to the deck hands followed a strict culture of both safety and "zero-discharge" policy. We didn't spill a drop of anything. Funny enough, though operations looked slower up close (we were never rushed into anything), we consistently broke drilling records in the gulf, and cataloged enough oil deposits to keep the world running for quite a while. I can't divulge details, but I giggle when I hear the phrase "oil shortage," because I know where the big deposits are.

    It might surprise you to know that even our garbage offset was reduced. Every bit of trash plastic needed to be cleaned, sorted, and recycled (though for the most part it would be better to be without junk plastic at all, but at least they were doing something).

    I don't know how it is down there now, but in 2012-2013 when I was down there, it seemed like the government down there owned all the leases, and directed most of the work to one drilling company. You might know the exact year since you seem to know a lot about the area. The president met with Hillary Clinton, and was later hit with a tear-gas canister following a nation-wide police strike. I was on a rig when they shut down the transportation grid.

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