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Thread: Adam Michael Birkholz

  1. #1
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    Adam Michael Birkholz

    This guy was a doctor and obviously a member of the GuR.
    He published or was somehow involved into some of the most interesting books of that period of time like:

    Compass of the Wise

    Hermes Trismegists true and natural path

    Die sieben heiligen Grundsäulen der Ewigkeit und Zeit

    Das hermetische A.B.C.

    His Pseudonyms were:

    Adam Melchior Birkholz
    Adama(h) Booz
    Michael Birchwood
    ICH (according to some researches, though I doubt it)

    The researches Ferguson, Knopp and/or Ferchel claimed he had published under the name "Philovite" as well.

    That book they have in mind seems to be quite rare online but can be found here:


    Die aus dem Hermetischen Brunnen hervorquellende Wahrheit : Oder: Die wahre Solarische und Lunarische Quintessenz; Der Wurzelbalsam alles Wesens, und Ursprung alles Lebens. Die Universallatwerge


    However it is obviously said on the first page that the translator was AdaMa Booz and the original book was french by said Philovite -of course a frenchman and not identical with Birkholz.

    The french original version can be found here:
    La vérité sortant du puits hermétique ou La vraye quintessence solaire et ...

  2. #2
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    I've never heard of him before, but I did a quick search on my harddrive:

    The Rose Cross and the Age of Reason (Christopher Macintosh) has the following footnote re: Compass

    23 Ketmia Vere ,Der Compass der Weisen (Berlin/Leipzig, Ringmacher, 1779). Wolfstieg (entry 42501) says that "Ketmia Vere" is a pseudonym for Adam Michael Birkholz. The book has also been attributed to the alchemist Jollifief.

    I believe the "adama(h) booz" comes from a text I have as "Taschenbuch für Alchemisten Theosophen" or at least it's mentioned there:




    "Philovite" I only have come up in, like you mention, Ferguson's Biblitheca Chemica, and the Innes Catalogue. The entry is mostly based on Ferguson, it would seem, but is slightly different.

  3. #3
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    According to Frick, Ketmia Vere wasn't Birkholz, but Schleiss von Löwenfeld.

    The author of the german quote you posted is uncertain about the authorship too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    According to Frick, Ketmia Vere wasn't Birkholz, but Schleiss von Löwenfeld.

    The author of the german quote you posted is uncertain about the authorship too.
    Now with those names, I have an old message thread from here (alchemyforums) saved, on the subject of the Compass of the Wise. It discusses a lot of this.

    Everything I'm bringing up on this returns back to GuR. I'm mostly familiar with Fictuld and Heinrich von Ecker und Eckhoffen. I know based simply on the images I looked for a translation of Freymäurerische Versammlungsreden der Gold- und Rosenkreutzer des alten Systems for awhile.

    I remember I went down this rabbit hole for awhile, twice I think.. for Compass of the Wise and again for Secret Figures. I collected some information on the Asiatic Brethren and knights of.. the light? i think it was.

    Unfortunately, there seems to be a wealth of information on these topics... if you read German. There's very little in english.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Marcus
    I know based simply on the images I looked for a translation of Freymäurerische Versammlungsreden der Gold- und Rosenkreutzer des alten Systems for awhile.
    Thanks Greg, I did not know this one before. Those GuR were a bunch of copycats. But quite amusing somehow:




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    Where's the second one from? I was sure I recognized the man.. but with a bent knee resting on half a peg-leg. I thought for sure it was from a version of Valentine's Azoth, but that isn't panning out so far.

    Any mention in the text of who the lady is? I recognize the "bow".. From Montfaucon's 'L'antiquité expliquée et representée en figures'. The prime suspects:





    based on the bared breasts of the reproduction, I'd be leaning towards Ceres, who i'm sure has been used before:



    Although according to the Golden Ass they are all the same:

    I am she that is the naturall mother of all things, mistresse and governesse of all the Elements, the initiall progeny of worlds, chiefe of powers divine, Queene of heaven! the principall of the Gods celestiall, the light of the goddesses: at my will the planets of the ayre, the wholesome winds of the Seas, and the silences of hell be diposed; my name, my divinity is adored throughout all the world in divers manners, in variable customes and in many names, for the Phrygians call me the mother of the Gods: the Athenians, Minerva: the Cyprians, Venus: the Candians, Diana: the Sicilians Proserpina: the Eleusians, Ceres: some Juno, other Bellona, other Hecate: and principally the Aethiopians which dwell in the Orient, and the Aegyptians which are excellent in all kind of ancient doctrine, and by their proper ceremonies accustome to worship mee, doe call mee Queene Isis.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Marcus
    Where's the second one from?
    It's from Michael Maier's Atalanta Fugiens.
    I was sure I recognized the man.. but with a bent knee resting on half a peg-leg. I thought for sure it was from a version of Valentine's Azoth, but that isn't panning out so far.
    I think you might refer/confuse it with the picture to B.V.'s first key:




    Any mention in the text of who the lady is? I recognize the "bow".. From Montfaucon's 'L'antiquité expliquée et representée en figures'. The prime suspects:
    The lady is obviously "nature". And the guys are alchemists trying to follow. A very typical symbol of alchemy. Of course a symbol can't be interpreted in just one single way. So imo your prime suspects count as well (see your last quote by Apuleius(?)).

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    Wow.. that's definitely the peg leg style I was talking about.. But he was walking in a forest, and I remember thinking.. "Is that the "vieillard" (old man) from the text? (Azoth).". But memory can be tricky.

    On the typical title page for Azoth though, I see Senior is portrayed with a walking stick/cane too...

  9. #9
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    Okay, the man was in exactly this style from a different version of the first key:



    And although I had given up, I found it. I was totally wrong. it was from Maier's Symbola avreae mensae dvodecim nationvm




    Speaking of copying, I don't think Maier has a single original image. I'm pretty sure they are all taken from Valentine, Book of Lamspring, Rosarium, and maybe a couple of others.

    My best version of the images of Valentine's 12 Keys actually come from a Maier re-print of the text. (in Tripus Aureus, i believe)

  10. #10
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    Talking about copying, the Rosarium is quite old, though the printed version is younger. One of the original sources of alchemical pictures are the MS of the "Buch der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit".



    A specialty here is, that it shows two hermaphrodites. A good and a bad one. That's quite unique, because one hermaphrodite alone would already allow such a symbolic interpretation. There are more very beautiful pictures, just try to google search.



    It's a pre-lutherian work, maybe that's the reason, why it was forgotten/neglected by the protestant surrounding of the GuR. One MS belonged to the chymist Johann Conrad Creiling (an "official" and respected chemist of the 17th/18th century), who was also publishing books on alchemy under a pseudonym.

    The Maier pics of Valentine's keys follow a certain interpretation. Even the original B.V. ones were included later and were not presented in the first version. Maier for example later placed the woman more towards saturn, to show it can be putrified as well. Whereas the gold is cleansed with antimony, silver is putrified with lead by means of cupellation. Therefore the king/gold - wolf/stibnite and queen/silver - vulcan/lead connection. At least that's the interpretation of Lawrence Principe. Others disagree, especially the author of "Le clef des douze clefs de B.V.", who definately was an 18/19th century author of the french Cyliani, Fulcanelli lineage.

    Trivia: Both Christian Rosenkreuz and Johann Valentin Andreae were lame (like vulcan/saturn) too.
    Last edited by Florius Frammel; 02-08-2019 at 03:51 PM.

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