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Thread: The amulets of Kaliningrad (Königsberg)

  1. #11
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    Wow thanks for sharing. Interesting. Seeing this amulet does anyone know what it says? Are those constellations in the middle?


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    That medaille from Catherine de medici shows zeus and venus (on the left). It is according to Harmening a magic amulet done after exact instruction by Agrippa von Nettesheim. The scene also is said to have something to do with the story of Ganymed. The right part is almost identical to the "Hagiel" amulet I posted before.
    Sorry I missed your edit above.. it brings up a couple of questions that I refrained from asking before. (Keeping in mind I haven't read Perspektiven Der Philosophie...)

    Originally you attribute the amulets to Friedrich Wilhelm II/Gold- und Rosenkreuzer, both dating to the 18th century. The language of the article you posted first states "a treasure with ultra rare medallions, dated from late Middle Ages" and later it says "the unique finding can be related to the 16th century". At first I'm pretty sure it dates the amulets themselves that time period, but the second statement makes me question whether they are talking abou the physical amulets, or only the symbolism of the amulets.

    I'd like to figure out which came first. Is the "Medaille de Catherine de Medici" the source material for the amulets.. were the amulets the source of the Medaille, or did they both share a common source. (the article mentions the "ultrarare"-ness of the amulets, but here they are in two places already. (And Catherine de Medici pre-dates Friedrich Wilhelm II by two centuries)

    Agrippa's works are the textbooks on this magic to be certain. So many books on these subjects after him really just repeat what he put down. But you can hardly research him without bumping into Trithemius (another place you'll find a lot of sigil magic). As I mentioned before, Catherine de Medici was a great patron of Nostradamus, an author who can't be understood without knowledge of Trithemius and Agrippa. (I'd also mention that while Nostradamus was busy influencing the French Court, John Dee, his contemporary, was busy influencing the English Court.. both probably being members of a "previous line" alluded to in the Manifestoes)


    According to the caption from "Perspektiven der Philosophie", the left is showing an astrological conjuction of Jupiter (Zeus) and Venus, as you said "It is according to Harmening a magic amulet done after exact instruction by Agrippa von Nettesheim. The scene also is said to have something to do with the story of Ganymed":




    This is already referring back to two recent blog posts, "Conjuction Junction" and "Jupiter (Zeus) vs. Sol". At this point I've read ABOUT the Aeneid but haven't read it.. I know what this meeting between Venus and Jupiter is about.. and here is Jupiter as a bird, like at the King's feet on the amulet:




    Here, from the gnostic amulets/gems, are several angels seated like the King on the amulet (two even accompanied by birds):




    On the amulet, if you compare the bird at the feet of the King, and the head of Venus, she's definitely stylized as a bird person, and this immediately reminded me of some depictions of Abraxas:




    And here are a bunch of gems featuring sigls:




    This one is a bit of a stretch, but this amulet showing the death/murder of the king:




    bears some similarity to these spikey headed people from the gnostic gems:


  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphim View Post
    Wow thanks for sharing. Interesting. Seeing this amulet does anyone know what it says? Are those constellations in the middle?
    I really couldn't tell you, but that's as good a guess as any. I'd have to transcribe the hebrew and see what pops out. I can tell you that the jewish amulets I posted are from the Magnes Collection:

    https://magnes.berkeley.edu/

    You'd have to find the links to their Flickr page.. I can't remember what kind of cataloguing information was with the images.

    Edit:

    I did come across these while researching something else, from Aryeh Kaplan's 'Sefer Yetsirah , The Book of Creation":







    I assume coming from Kaplan these are from authentic jewish sources.
    Last edited by Greg Marcus; 04-07-2019 at 08:32 PM.

  4. #14
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    Jupiter's/Zeus' bird is an eagle with the name "Aithon"(old greek) (lat. Aethon) = sparkling, burning". It's also the symbol of St. John.

    There are many interesting texts about this bird, like it eating the liver of Prometheus, or Jupiter/Zeus seducing and kidnaping Ganymed under his eagle form.

    The source also says that this amulet of Catherine de Medici was the most precious magic amulet existing. It is assumed it has something to do with fertility and sex. Both Catherine and king Friedrich Wilhelm II had their "issues" with this topic.
    Last edited by Florius Frammel; 04-07-2019 at 05:58 PM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    Jupiter's/Zeus' bird is an eagle with the name "Aithon"(old greek) (lat. Aethon) = sparkling, burning". It's also the symbol of St. John.

    There are many interesting texts about this bird, like it eating the liver of Prometheus, or Jupiter/Zeus seducing and kidnaping Ganymed under his eagle form.

    The source also says that this amulet of Catherine de Medici was the most precious magic amulet existing. It is assumed it has something to do with fertility and sex. Both Catherine and king Friedrich Wilhelm II had their "issues" with this topic.
    That is very interesting. The first time you mentioned it I knew I was going to end up looking up the associated mythology sooner or later. I went through the same thing just based on those beautiful miniatures from the Aeneid manuscript I came across, and the mythology of the Battle of Scorpious and Orion, etc. So it's definitely on the list now. I wonder if the sparkling/burning bird has any relation to the Phoenix?

    You had hit the nail on the head with the Agrippa comments, he's the main source, but he himself had unknown sources, although I don't believe he travelled to ancient lands. That's where my comparison with Macarius' work on the Basilidian gnostic 'gems' comes in.. Although a bit later than Agrippa, he was one of those proto-archaelogist Jesuits that did spend time in those places. His Abraxas work was published posthumously in 1652, but it had obviously existed in manuscript before then. Kircher also covers some of the same material (Macarius may have actually been a main source of his) in his Arithmologia sive De abditis numerorum mysterijs

    Around 1510, Agrippa was studying with the aforementioned Johannes Trithemius. Here is an excellent article on Trithemius (the background info is very interesting): German monk's 500-year-old mystery solved

    So this all has to do with these magical amulets of late medieval origin, and their transmission to Friedrich Wilhelm II through the Gold und Rosenkreuzer. And through this Catherine de Medici has come up, and we've name-dropped Agrippa, Trithemius, John Dee, and Nostradamus. (if you read the above article, Trithemius was even visited by mathematicians - something Dee was known for as well). Nostradamus interpretation and research was one of the first things I found my way into.. Here's a couple of pieces of information from a researcher i used to have correspondence with 20 some years ago. This is all in terms of the Reform and Protestantism and potentially Rosicrucianism:

    HISTORICAL FACTS (after publication of the Qs): The idea of a summary execution of the Protestant leaders, which would be the means of putting an end to the civil discord that had caused three "religious wars" in France in 1562-1563, 1567-1568, and 1569-1570 respectively, had long existed in the mind of Catherine de' Medici, widow of Henry II and mother of the three successive kings, Francis II, Charles IX, and Henry III; it had also been entertained by her sons. As early as 1560 Michaelis Suriano, the Venetian ambassador, wrote:

    "Francis II (1559-1560) wanted to fall upon the Protestant leaders, punish them without mercy and thus extinguish the conflagration."

    When, in 1565, Catherine de' Medici with her son Charles IX (1560-1574) and her daughters Margaret of Valois and Elizabeth, wife of Philip II, investigated the political and religious questions of the hour at the conferences of Bayonne. If you wish to serve the truth, you should be focusing on Catherine de Medici. SHE is the main reason for The Centuries. To understand why, you have to go back and study the 1520s, and you will find the answer you seek. Who was she? What was she doing in France?

    Agrippa (b.1486 at Cologne) served Maximilian I as a soldier and proved his valour. Touched bases with Trithemius c.1507 You will find Agrippa (a disciple of Reuchlin?) performing experiments in Paris around that time. Lectured at Dôle. Then off to England to do a little spying. Did Agrippa found a secret society in Paris? If so, who were its members?
    I think, because of some of the things we have discussed, you might find these message threads very interesting:

    And because of the searches on these names I've been doing, here's an excerpt that popped up from Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum":


    “The English Templars meet the Portuguese in 1464. After that date, the British Isles seem to be struck by a cabalistic fervor.

    Anyway, the Templars work on what they have learned, preparing for the next encounter. John Dee is the leader of this magic and hermetic renaissance. He collects a personal library of four thousand volumes, a library in the spirit of the Templars of Provins. His Monas Hieroglyphica seems directly inspired by the Tabula smaragdina, the bible of the alchemists.

    And what does John Dee do from 1584 on? He reads the Steganographia of Trithemius! He reads it in manuscript, of course, because it appeared in print for the first time only in the early seventeenth century. Dee, the grand master of the English group that suffered the failure of the missed appointment, wants to discover what happened, where the error lay. Since he is also a good astronomer, he slaps himself on the brow and says, ‘What an idiot I was!’ He starts studying the Gregorian reform, after he obtains an appanage from Elizabeth, to see how to rectify the mistake. But he realizes it’s too late. He doesn’t know whom to get in touch with in France. He has contacts, however, in the Mittel-europaische area.

    The Prague of Rudolf II is one big alchemist laboratory; so Dee goes to Prague and meets Khunrath, the author of Amphitheatrum sapientiae aeternae, whose allegorical plates later influenced both Andreae and the Rosicrucian manifestoes. What sort of relationships does Dee establish? I don’t know. Shattered by remorse at having committed an irreparable error, he dies in 1608. Not to worry, though, because in London someone else is at work—a man who, everybody now agrees, was a Rosicrucian and who spoke of the Rosicrucians in his New Atlantis. I mean Francis Bacon.”

  6. #16
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    That is an interesting carpet you are weaving here..

    The eagle is not a phoenix for sure. But both symbols have some things in common of course..

    You might want to look up details of the wedding of Elizabeth Stuart with Friedrich V.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizab...een_of_Bohemia

    The garden where the party took place was said to be designed with a lot of rosicrucian symbols and all the famous alchemists and occultists were present. Some even claim that this wedding was an influence of the "Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz", after which the second book of the 17th century R+C was named.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Florius Frammel View Post
    The garden where the party took place was said to be designed with a lot of rosicrucian symbols and all the famous alchemists and occultists were present. Some even claim that this wedding was an influence of the "Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz", after which the second book of the 17th century R+C was named.
    Well now we're opening pandora's box... I had to look her up.. Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia. I was familiar with Heidelberg, which I saw right away scanning the wikipedia article.

    This Stuart/Stewart stuff is going to bring us back to my favorite subject, the "Scottish Faction". I just read that her grandson succeeded the last Stuart monarch, starting the Hanoverian dynasty (mind you her grandson was still a Stewart as well).

    The article says they were married at Whitehall.. I am not aware of such a garden there.. it goes on to say "It was celebrated with lavish and sophisticated festivities both in London and Heidelberg", so I assume the party you refer to (and the garden) was at Heidelberg...

    I believe (for some reason, can't find it now) that these "Renaissance gardens" were called "Pleasaunces". These gardens are featured in Flamel, Maier, even the frontispiece of Kircher's Ars Magna Luis et Umbrae.

    So anyhow, who I am familiar with is James VI/I and Anne of Denmark, Elizabeth Stuart's parents, and of course, there's connections to the Scots, Nostadamus, and these "gardens".

    There is a famous example of these gardens at Edzell Castle in Scotland. The garden was the work of Sir David Lindsay, Lord Edzell. He received Mary Queen of Scots at Edzell in 1562, although this is before the creation of the Garden, which he laid out in 1604 (the year the Manifestoes were published). In his Hermetic Journal No. 4, McLean refers to it as "A Rosicrucian/Alchemical Mystery Centre in Scotland", and compares it to an Egyptian initiation temple.

    The garden features carvings of the Planetary Deities, Liberal Arts, and Cardinal virtues

    "The carvings are all based on popular series of engravings, which were often published in pattern books. Nuremberg was the origin of numerous such books, and one may have been brought to Edzell by the miner Hans Ziegler.[29] Specifically, the images of the deities are derived from engravings of 1528–29 by the German artist Georg Pencz (or Iorg Bentz, c. 1500–1550), a pupil of Albrecht Dürer; the initials I. B. appear on the carving of Mars. The arts and virtues are both based on engravings derived from paintings by the Flemish artist Marten de Vos.[30] The engravings, by Jan Sadeler and Crispijn de Passe, were widely distributed in Scotland, along with those of the deities. Indeed, the image of Prudence is identical to that used by the King's Master of Works William Schaw, in the spectacular display to welcome Queen Anne to Scotland, following her marriage to James VI in 1589.[31]"
    [..snip]
    The symbolism of the garden, particularly of the carvings, as well as the repetition of sevens and threes, has inspired many interpretations. The engravings upon which the carvings are based were commonplace in Scotland at the time, and were frequently used in the art of memory, a mnemonic memory technique associated with Freemasonry. The art of memory had become a feature throughout Scottish culture, from the court of Queen Anne, Danish consort of James VI, to the lodges of operative stonemasons.[34] The potential influence of Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe's symbolic garden at Uraniborg, which was visited by James IV of Scotland in 1590, has also been noted.[35]

    Sir David Lindsay would have been well aware of the symbolic allusions of the carvings. In correspondence with his brother, Lord Menmuir, he discusses the relationship of the planets to the metals, which he had employed Hans Ziegler to search for on his land. Sir David's nephew, David Lindsay, 1st Lord Balcarres, was noted for his interest in alchemy and the Rosicrucians.

    Historian Adam McLean has suggested that the garden is associated with the Rosicrucians, and "should be seen as an early 17th-century Mystery Temple".[36] McLean describes the garden as a place of instruction, and remarks that the whole structure is reminiscent of "Eliphas Levi's description of the ancient Tarot of the Egyptians carved into the walls of their initiation temples, to which the candidate was taken to contemplate the sequence of the symbols".[37] He backs up this suggestion with the observation that the Mantegna Tarocchi, a set of 15th-century engravings formerly thought to be a tarocchi or tarot deck, includes all these images amongst its symbols.
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edzell_Castle
    I know I've read somewhere that Queen Anne visited Edzell at some point. A little more on Queen Anne and the Art of Memory:

    'The reference to the art of memory may be taken as a direct reference to renaissance esotericism. William Fowler, who had been a colleague of Schaw both in his trip to Denmark and at Dunfermline, had instructed Queen Anne of Denmark in the technique. Indeed Fowler had met Italian philosopher Giordano Bruno at the house of Michel de Castelnau in London in the 1580s. The art of memory constituted an important element of Bruno's magical system.'

    Sir David Lindsay, Lord Edzell, was the uncle of Sir David Lindsay, 1st Lord Balcarres was known to collect alchemical and Rosicrucian manuscripts:

    "it is recorded that Sir David Lindsay, the first Earl of Balcarres, chose a private life without ambition, was learned, and had the best collection of books in his time and was a laborious chymist. There is in the library of Balcarres ten volumes written by his own hand upon the then fashionable subject of the philosopher’s stone."
    It is thought that Vaughan's translation of the Manifesto was based on 1st Lord Balcarres work:

    "The Fame and Confession [Vaughan's] has affinities with a manuscript translation in the Scots dialect dated "Balcarres, 1633." The 1633 translation belonged to Sir David Lindsay, who was made the first Baron of Balcarres that year. It reamins in the library of the Earls of Crawford and Balcarres along with other manuscripts that attest Lindsay's interest in the occult: "ten volumes of transcripts and translations of alchemical and Rosicrucian works."
    and

    Like the Sinclairs, Setons and Montgomeries, with whom they were associated, the Lindsays had long been among the noble Scottish families steeped in 'esoteric' tradition. Lord Balcarres himself was known as an Hermeticist and practising alchemist. His wife was the daughter of Alexander Seton of the Seton-Montgomery branch of the family, which was to play a key role in later Freemasonry.
    So to get back to the Stewarts..The Lindsays were strong Stewart supporters (at this point, anyways). Elizabeth's father was King of Scotland as James VI, and King of England and Ireland as James I (this is the first triple crown, more on this below), and his wife was Anne of Denmark. Their son, brother of Elizabeth, ruled England, Scotland, and Ireland was Charles I. He was coronated as King of England and Ireland on 02-02-1626, and King of Scotland on 18-6-1633.

    And this brings me back to Nostadamus.

    Century 9, Quatrain 33
    Hercules Roy de Rome & d'Annemarc,
    De Gaule trois Guion surnomme',
    Trembler l'Italie & l'vnde de sainct Marc,
    Premier sur tous monarque renomme'.

    The triple crown/chief bit is about being king of England, Ireland, and Scotland. d'annemarc is a play on Anne of Denmark... and if you check the "numbers". 9 is an upside down 6. So 6/9 - 3 - 3. The coronation of Charles?

    18-6-1633. or 6 x 3 - 6 - 1633.

    David Lindsay's (1st Lord Balcarres) son, Alexander, narrowly avoided arrest due to being a supporter of the Stewarts. Having advance warning, he packed up his father's famous library and sent collections to different people before escaping to the continent:

    He visited France to advise the king in 1653 and 1654 and finally resided at the court in exile of Charles II in the Netherlands. Lady Anna served as a governess to Prince William of Orange.[4] Lord Balcarres died at Breda and was succeeded by his son Charles.
    I've skipped over a bunch of names.. Drummond, Erksine, Napier, Schaw, Moray (who was with Alexander and Charles II in exile), so many others. Oh hell, here's a little more:

    "In Moray's surviving correspondence with Lauderdale, there are suggestions of their continuing usage of Freemasonry—both philosophically and politically—in their consultations with Charles II concerning Scottish affairs. When Lauderdale was in Scotland, he made Moray his deputy in London, and he gave his friend access to his 'litde closet at Whitehall,' where he kept his most precious books and manuscripts. Among these was his 'little octavo Hebrew Bible without points,' which he asked Moray to send to him.174 Charles II was also collecting Hebrew books, which would later be donated by Solomon da Costa, descendant of royalist Jews, to the new British Museum.175 The king also shared the Scots' interests in mystical and practical alchemy, and Moray often used the chemistry lab at Whitehall to hold secret conversations with him."
    and

    "That Balcarres's transcription of the Rosicrucian treatises was made in 1633 suggests a connection with the king's visit. As a confidante of Drummond, who planned the poetic tributes for the visit, he may have been aware of the Rosicrucian-Masonic prophecy in Adamson's poem. Balcarres's descendant and family historian Lord Lindsay noted that 'it is not impossible indeed that he may have become a brother of the 'Rosy Cross,' if indeed that celebrated society ever existed.'173 In Balcarres's notebooks there are discussions of Pythagorean mathematics, the Temple in Jerusalem, and Serlio's architectural drawings, and it seems certain that he was a Freemason. His future son-in-law, Sir Robert Moray, combined Rosicrucian studies with Masonic membership, and he was close to Balcarres's family. In 1634, evidently inspired by his Scottish visit, Ancram merged his Rosicrucian and Masonic interests when he made a manuscript translation of Schweigardts' Speculum Sophicum Rhodostaurotica, which included the axioms of the 'singularly illuminated fraternity of the Rosae Cruets' much Hebrew lettering, and a fold-out ink drawing of the 'Collegium Fraternitatis.'174 In the same year, a similar kind of merger was possibly made by Robert Fludd, after the publication of Clavis Philosophiae with its identification of Frizius as a Scot and its claim that the Rosicrucians now go under a different name (the Wise). Fludd's residence on Coleman Street, City of London, was close to the Masons' Hall, and in an inventory of the company's holdings made in 1663 there was listed 'one book with the constitutions that Mr. Fflood gave.'175 (Unfortunately, the date of the donation was not given). That Fludd—like the Scottish students of Rosicrucianism— was honored by the king reinforces the case for Charles's own interest in the ideals of the illuminated fraternity."
    Linking back to Gold und Rosenkreuzer:

    Under the leadership of Hermann Fictuld the group reformed itself extensively in 1767 and again in 1777 because of political pressure. Its members claimed that the leaders of the Rosicrucian Order had invented Freemasonry and only they knew the secret meaning of Masonic symbols. The Rosicrucian Order had been founded by Egyptian "Ormusse" or "Licht-Weise" who had emigrated to Scotland with the name "Builders from the East". In 1785 and 1788 the Golden and Rosy Cross group published the Geheime Figuren or "The Secret Symbols of the 16th and 17th century Rosicrucians".

  8. #18
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    Yes, I meant the gardens by Salomon de Caus:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salomon_de_Caus

    and yes, his famous work is this garden Hortus Palatinus next to the castle of Heidelberg and where the meeting took place in 1613.

    Unfortunately the garden is lost, but de Caus himself wrote a book (in french) with coppers how it looked like. There exist other works on this garden too.

    The garden was said to represent the macrocosm and it was supposed to be possible to influence the movement of the planets and perform other kinds of magic there.

    One year later the Fama Fraternitas was published. Of course the R+C claimed the manuscripts were older.
    Last edited by Florius Frammel; 04-12-2019 at 04:34 AM.

  9. #19
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    When I see Heidelberg mentioned, I immediately think about waterclocks and water (or perhaps steam-powered) automatons that would move and maybe sound like they are speaking, and all that good stuff. Looking up de Caus, I guess that was him. I thought I might have read about it originally in Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". The first time I read that was a long time ago.. the last time I read it was quite awhile ago, so I've forgotten a lot. Look at all the stuff that was popping up:

    “Not much more to say. After the London festivities, the festivities begin in Heidelberg, where Salomon de Caus has built for the elector the hanging gardens of which we saw a dim reflection that night in Piedmont, as you’ll recall. And in the course of these festivities, an allegorical float appears, celebrating the bridegroom as Jason, and from the two masts of the ship recreated on the float hang the symbols of the Golden Fleece and the Garter. I hope you haven’t forgotten that the Golden Fleece and the Garter are also found on the columns of Tomar...Everything fits. In the space of a year, the Rosicrucian manifestoes come out: the appeal that the English Templars, with the help of their German friends, are making to all Europe, to reunite the lines of the interrupted Plan.” “But what exactly are they after?”
    “Rudolph’s physician was a man named Michael Maier, who later wrote a book of visual and musical emblems, the Atalanta Fugiens, an orgy of philosopher’s eggs, dragons biting their tails, sphinxes. Nothing was more luminous than a secret cipher; everything was the hieroglyph of something else. Think about it. Galileo was dropping stones from the Tower of Pisa, Richelieu played Monopoly with half of Europe, and in the meantime they all had their eyes peeled to read the signs of the world. Pull of gravity, indeed; something else lies beneath (or, rather, above) all this, something quite different. Would you like to know what? Abracadabra. Torricelli invented the barometer, but the rest of them were messing around with ballets, water games, and fireworks in the Hortus Palatinus in Heidelberg. And the Thirty Years’ War was about to break out.”

    “The route itself is ritual,” Aglie was telling us as we climbed the hill. “These are hanging gardens, just like—or almost—the ones Salomon de Caus devised for Heidelberg, that is, for the Palatine elector Frederick V, in the great Rosicrucian century. The light is poor, and so it should be, because it is better to sense than to see: our host has not reproduced the Salomon de Caus design literally; he had concentrated it in a narrower space. The gardens of Heidelberg imitated the macrocosm, but the person who reconstructed them here has imitated only the microcosm. Look at that rocaille grotto...Decorative, no doubt. But Caus had in mind the emblem of the Atalanta Fugiens of Michael Maier, where coral is the philosopher’s stone. Caus knew that the heavenly bodies can be influenced by the form of a garden, because there are patterns whose configuration mimes the harmony of the universe...”

    “Fantastic,” Garamond said. “But how does a garden influence the planets?”

    “There are signs that attract one another, that look at one another, embrace, and enforce love. But they do not have—they must not have—a certain and definite form. A man will try out giveij forces according to the dictates of his passion or the impulse of his spirit; this happened with the hieroglyphics of the Egyptians. For there can be no relationship between us and divine beings except through seals, figures, characters, and ceremonies. Thus the divinities speak to us through dreams and oracles. And that is what these gardens are. Every aspect of this terrace reproduces a mystery of the alchemist’s art, but unfortunately we can no longer read it, not even our host can. An unusual devotion to secrecy, you will agree, in this man who spends what he has saved over the years in order to design ideograms whose meaning he has lost.”

    As we climbed from terrace to terrace, the gardens changed. Some were in the form of a labyrinth, others in the form of an emblem, but each terrace could be viewed in its entirety only from a higher one. Looking down, I saw the outline of a crown, and other patterns I had been unable to embrace as I was passing through them. But even from above, I could not decipher them. Each terrace, seen as one moved among its hedges, presented some images, but the perspective from above revealed new, even contradictory images, as if every step of that stairway spoke two different languages at once.


    “Did Bacon really talk about them?” Belbo asked.

    “Strictly speaking, no, but a certain John Heydon rewrote the New Atlantis under the title The Holy Land, and he put the Rosicrucians in it. But for us that makes no difference. Bacon didn’t mention them by name for obvious reasons of discretion, but it’s as if he did.”

    “And a pox on doubters.”

    “Right. It’s because of Bacon that attempts are made to strengthen relations between the English and German circles. In 1613 Elizabeth, daughter of James I, now reigning, marries Frederick V, Elector Palatine of the Rhine. After the death of Rudolf II, Prague is no longer the ideal location; Heidelberg is. The wedding of the elector and the princess is a triumph of Templar allegories. In the course of the London festivities, Bacon himself is the impresario, and an allegory of mystical knighthood is performed, with an appearance of the knights on the top of a hill. It is obvious that Bacon is now Dee’s successor, grand master of the English Templar group...”
    This garden stuff is directly related to the geometry I'm so interested in:

    'Why, then, should we not permit ourselves a universal image, that is an image of the universe itself? From which it might be hoped to obtain much benefit from the universe.'
    [...]
    'He [Ficino] then says that the figure of the world may be constructed so as to reproduce the motion of the spheres, as was done by Archimedes, and has been done recently by a Florentine called Lorenzo. He is here referring to the astronomical clock made by Lorenzo della Volpaia for Lorenzo de' Medici which contained representations of the planets. Such a figure of the world, says Ficino, is made not only to be gazed at but to be meditated upon in the soul. It is obviously a different kind of object to the one previously hinted at. It is a cosmic mechanism.'
    [...]
    'Finally, someone may construct, or will construct: on the domed ceiling of the innermost cubicle of his house, where he mostly lives and sleeps, such a figure with the colours in it. And when he comes out of his house he will perceive, not so much the spectacle of individual things, but the figure of the universe and its colours.'
    [...]
    'In short, these unfortunately so vaguely hinted at works of art are functional; they are made for a purpose, for magical use. By arranging the figure of the world and its celestial images with knowledge and skill, the Magus controls the influences of the stars. Just as Hermes Trismegistus arranged the images in the City of Adocentyn, which was planned as an image of the world, so as to regulate the astral influences on the inhabitants in such a way as to keep them healthy and virtuous, so Ficino's 'figures of the world' would be calculated to regulate the influences in the direction indicated in the Libri de Vita, towards a predominance of Solar, Jovial, and Venereal influences and towards an avoidance of Saturn and Mars.'
    [...]
    'The point in the description of the 'figures of the world' to which I want to draw particular attention in view of later developments in this book is that these figures are not only to be looked at but reflected or remembered within. The man who stares at the figure of the world on his bedroom ceiling, imprinting it and its dominating colours of the planets on memory, when he comes out of his house and sees innumerable individual things is able to unify these through the images of a higher reality which he has within.'

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    945
    Thanks for all the interesting information! Can you tell your sources too?

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