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Thread: Calcium

  1. #31
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    Thank you Kibric so much for sharing your wonderful experiment. It sounds quite exciting to find a red substance in something simple. Of course, those are always the exciting experiments when you find something amazing from an elegantly simple process.

    Then again, I find that these wonderful curios tend to be fickle, especially when one doesn't have a proper working knowledge of the process, that of course is where experimentation comes in, and practice.

    I think this is wonderful, and I'll put in a vote now for a sticky. Such a great thread.

    I do have one question, and this pertains to the milk. Have you found that store-bought milk works for this process, or does one need to go straight to the cow, so to speak? You didn't mention cream separation specifically, so I wonder if off-the-shelf milk here in the US would work, as it has been treated with heat and atomized to ensure that there are no fat globules contained in it that can "stick" together to make a cream layer. Not sure if things are similar where you are located. There is a source of "real" milk not far from me, and I'm sure my friends down the road would be happy to get me some on their next run, but it would be easier to just snatch some up after work from the local market.

  2. #32
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    My question is, did the ancients know that bones were primarily composed of the same element, calcium, as disparate substances like limestone? Would be curious to see any evidence supporting such a thing.
    Feel free to PM me. Always interested in networking. Don't be shy, dearie.
    http://i.imgur.com/RoTaXgG.jpg

  3. #33
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    Of course, those are always the exciting experiments when you find something amazing from an elegantly simple process.
    My philosophy is this. The simplest method or concoction is usually the right way.

    I think this is wonderful, and I'll put in a vote now for a sticky. Such a great thread.
    Thanks.

    I do have one question, and this pertains to the milk. Have you found that store-bought milk works for this process, or does one need to go straight to the cow, so to speak?
    Fresh is best but it doesn't really make much difference.

    did the ancients know that bones were primarily composed of the same element, calcium, as disparate substances like limestone?
    Hunter gatherers would break the bones of mastodons to extract the marrow to eat. They knew they had bones and marrow like the animals they hunted.
    In the limestone caves they found fossilized shells and bones. They saw stalactites composed of thick dripping water.
    When they put it all together and identified what was in bones,limestone,stalactites, must of been when they started heating them.
    Realising they all reacted in similar ways. An exact date for this i don't know. When industrial mining came about in Sumeria, Egypt the understanding of chemistry expanded.
    My guess is then. Its a very good question that needs further study.

    Eating marrow appears in nearly every civilization and mythology.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow_(food)

    Gough's Cave famously held the remains of human bones that had been butchered to extract marrow in exactly the same way as animal bones on the site had been processed.
    Our modern sensibilities find the thought of cannibalism repulsive, but these people lived in a different age, Dr Bello said:
    "They were a one man band; they were going out, hunting, butchering and then eating their kill. And they were extremely skilled at what they did, but then that's how they survived.
    "I think the production of the skull-cups is ritualistic. If the purpose was simply to break the skulls to extract the brain to eat it, there are much easier ways to do that.
    "If food was the objective, the skull would be highly fragmented. But here you can really see they tried to preserve most of the skull bone; the cut marks tell us they tried to clean the skull, taking off every piece of soft tissue so that they could then modify it very precisely. They were manufacturing something."
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12478115
    Last edited by Kibric; 08-22-2019 at 03:29 PM.

  4. #34
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    An interesting comment about biological transmutation found on science forums.

    A number of chemists report that plants, animals and human beings
    ROUTINELY TRANSMUTE MID-RANGE ELEMENTS (for example, potassium into
    calcium or magnesium into calcium) AS PART OF THEIR ORDINARY DAILY
    METABOLISM. These transmutations obey rules such as: Mg + O => Ca; K + H
    => Ca. This is revolutionary since, according to current physical theory,
    the energy levels required for such transmutations are billions of times
    higher than what is available in biological systems. Equally inexplicable
    fission reactions such as Ca => Mg + O; Ca => K + H are also reported.
    But revolutions in physics have repeatedly occurred, such as the quantum
    revolution in which the radical property of non-locality, previously
    considered impossible, is now accepted by physicists (see Aspect and

    Grangier 1986, Bransden and Joachain 1989, p.671-681, Chiao et al 1993,

    Squires 1990, p.173, Rae 1986, p.25-44, and Penrose 1990, p.369).

    What I am presenting here is not the "cold fusion" of Fleischmann and
    Pons which, as far as I know, lacks clear evidence of actual fusion. Even
    if the Fleischmann and Pons effect turns out to be actual fusion, it is
    only the fusion of isotopes of the lightest element hydrogen under special
    laboratory conditions which is quite different from the UNEQUIVOCAL FUSION
    AND FISSION OF MID-RANGE elements found in biological transmutation reports.

    Now let us examine the evidence for biological transmutation. Crabs,
    shellfish and crayfish have shells made largely of calcium. A crab 17 cm
    by 10 cm has a shell weighing around 350 grams. Periodically these animals
    shed their shell and create a new one. This is called molting. When
    molting, a crab is very vulnerable and hides away from all other creatures
    so it can not get calcium by preying on other creatures. According to
    French chemist C. Louis Kervran of the Conseil d'Hygiene in Paris, sea
    water contains far too little calcium to account for the rapid production
    of a shell (the calcium content of sea water is about 0.042% and a crab
    can form a new shell in little more than one day). If the entire body of a
    crab is analyzed for calcium, it is found to contain only enough calcium
    to produce 3% of the shell (even taking into account the calcium carbonate
    stored in the hepato-pancreas just before molting).
    Even in water completely devoid of calcium, shellfish can still create
    their calcium-bearing shells as shown by an experiment performed at the
    Maritime Laboratory of Roscoff: "A crayfish was put in a sea water basin
    from which calcium carbonate had been removed by precipitation; the animal
    made its shell anyway." (Kervran 1972, p.58)
    "Chemical analysis made on animals secreting their shells has revealed
    that calcium carbonate is formed on the outer side of a membrane although
    on the opposite side of the membrane, where matter enters, there is no
    calcium. This fact has left specialists perplexed." (Kervran 1972, p.58)
    Sea water contains a sufficient amount of magnesium to form a shell if
    we accept Kervran's proposition that crabs routinely transmute magnesium
    into calcium; Mg + O => Ca.
    It would be interesting to put a crayfish in water devoid of both
    calcium and magnesium and see if it can still create its shell.
    Normal egg shells produced by hens contain calcium. Kervran (1972,
    p.41) reported an experiment in which hens were confined in an area in
    which there was no source of calcium and no calcium was present in their
    diet. The calcium deficiency became clearly manifested after a few days
    when the hens began to lay eggs with soft shells. Then purified mica
    (which contains potassium) was given to the hens. Kervran (1972, p.41)
    described what then transpired: "The hens jumped on the mica and began
    scratching around it very rapidly, panting over it; then they rested,
    rolling their heads on it, threw it into the air, and began scratching it
    again. The next day eggs with normal shells (weight 7 grams) were laid.
    Thus, in the 20 hours that intervened, the hens transformed a supply of
    potassium into calcium. ... An experiment of this kind, using the same
    mica, was undertaken with guinea-fowls over a period of forty days. The
    administering of the mica was suspended three times and each time a
    soft-shelled egg was laid ... ."
    One might suggest that the calcium in the egg shells was borrowed from
    the bones of the hens. But if this is true, why were soft eggs laid when
    the mica was withheld and normal eggs laid when mica was given to the
    hens? In order to avoid the conclusion that the hens transmuted potassium
    into calcium, one would have to show that mica somehow stimulates a
    metabolic pathway in which calcium is removed from the hen's bones and
    used in the production of the egg shells. This could be completely refuted
    by feeding the hens mica (and of course absolutely no calcium) for such a
    long period of time that all the calcium in their bones would have been
    completely exhausted. If after that time the hens still produce
    calcium-bearing egg shells, we must conclude that the calcium in the egg
    shells is not being taken from the bones. At that point, we seem to have
    no choice but to acknowledge the transmutation of potassium into calcium
    within the hens.
    https://www.scienceforums.net/topic/...ct-or-fiction/

  5. #35
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    Some further thoughts I had on this.

    Do you ever get our blackness in the vessel? It sounds like it goes from white straight to red. Also have you tried having the separation occur before distilling the milk? You can even do this with pasturized milk if you collect germs from outside in suitable medium like rice wash. Maybe the biological effects on the medium would have an effect on the outcome.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kibric View Post
    Hunter gatherers would break the bones of mastodons to extract the marrow to eat. They knew they had bones and marrow like the animals they hunted.
    In the limestone caves they found fossilized shells and bones. They saw stalactites composed of thick dripping water.
    When they put it all together and identified what was in bones,limestone,stalactites, must of been when they started heating them.
    Realising they all reacted in similar ways. An exact date for this i don't know. When industrial mining came about in Sumeria, Egypt the understanding of chemistry expanded.
    My guess is then. Its a very good question that needs further study.
    I think this is a great point! Our ancestors may not have had the periodic table of elements but there were many methods of reasoning well before then that could have helped!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philosophical View Post
    Some further thoughts I had on this.
    Do you ever get our blackness in the vessel?
    I don't want to answer for Kibric, but it was mentioned that one path let the milk go through a black stage after the red streaks, and on to produce a white crystalline compound.

    I am curious about these white crystals and any effects noted in their production, Kibric, as you seem fond of them. I'm also curious if you've tried imbibing with anything other than water distilled from milk, or if that simply worked and you've been running with it. Would be curious to see if you get similar results imbibing with distilled water.

    That said, I'm sure the best way to find out is to try it myself. It's on the checklist when I have time. Might give it a go nearer to winter.

  7. #37
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    Do you ever get our blackness in the vessel?
    but it was mentioned that one path let the milk go through a black stage after the red streaks, and on to produce a white crystalline compound.
    Yes. You can also get blackness called our Saturn, from drying the philosophical water ( oil ) as well.

    As this blacknesse is called Saturn, so it is likewise called Lead. Thence Agadimon in the Turba says decoct the æs or brasse till the blacknesse which they call money comes forth, and mix well the materials of our Art, and then you will presently find blacknesse, which is the Lead of the Philosophers so much spoken of in their books
    Therefore with this water or this Fire the Philosophickal Æs or Brasse must be washed from its superfluous Humors: that is, it must be dried.
    http://www.levity.com/alchemy/atl11-5.html

    I'm also curious if you've tried imbibing with anything other than water distilled from milk, or if that simply worked and you've been running with it. Would be curious to see if you get similar results imbibing with distilled water.
    Use its partner, fatty water from milk. Regular water doesn't have the liquid crystal structure ( fatty viscous ).
    You want to imbibe with its own water. Its own like or kin. Or the crystals won't melt properly.

  8. #38
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    Thanks for sharing Kibric and everyone. I didn't know milk was so interesting.
    Last edited by Seraphim; 08-25-2019 at 04:07 PM.

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