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Thread: Why is Qi-Gong and Tai Qi considered Alchemy?

  1. #1
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    Why is Qi-Gong and Tai Qi considered Alchemy?

    Alchemy in ancient China came from a long history of exploration of natural science, Daoism, and mineral science, all of which was intertwined into a scientific specialty termed Shen Dan.

    Between 200 AD and 1000 AD this science of Shen Dan reached its heights, and became very complex, both in laboratory experiments and in daily health practices. Qi gong is mixed up with and emerged from this same period of time, Some Qi Gong schools are called 5 Elements Qi Gong.



    The theory insists that inside the body are three cauldrons. It is there that you can place elements and mix them, by using your breath to do it.




    There are three forces that interact. Chinese call these Chi Jing and Shen. These three forces are also called in Ayurveda (ojas, tejas and prana) and are interrelated. Prana and tejas are rooted in ojas and can be regarded as aspects of ojas. Tejas is the heat and light energy of ojas that has an oily quality and, like ghee can sustain a flame. Prana is the energy and strength that comes from ojas after it has been kindled into tejas. Ojas proper is the potential, the stamina of the mind and nervous system for holding tejas and prana. Ojas has the capacity to turn into tejas (heat), which has the capacity to turn into prana (electricity).

    The three forces are also associated with locations in the body where the alchemical process takes place. These locations include major organs and energy centers, called dantians or chakras.



    Transformation is not a change of energy. You cannot change the higher energy. You can allow it to find a place in you. ~Gurdjieff Work with Madame de Salzmann.


    Cinnabar - Mercury and Transmutation

    Here in the 559 vow taken by Tiantai Buddhist patriarch Nanyue Huisi praying to successfully make an elixir that would keep him alive till the coming of Maitreya

    "I am seeking for the longevity in order to defend the Faith, not in order to enjoy worldly happiness. I pray that all the saints and sages will come to my help, so that I may get some good magic mushrooms [zhi 芝], and numinous elixirs [shendan 神丹], enabling me to cure all illnesses and to stop both hunger and thirst. In this way I shall be able to practice continually the way of the Sutras and to engage in the several forms of meditations. I shall hope to find a peaceful dwelling in the depths of the mountains, with enough numinous elixirs and medicine to carry out my plans. Thus by the aids of external elixirs [waidan] I shall be able to cultivate the elixir within [neidan]."

    The term Xian thus refers to the Daoist alchemical sages that took the elixirs, xiandan, and achieved a transcendent state of being or mind.

    For many, the end result of the taking of elixirs was their death, and historians judge this as the failure of the toxic elixirs, or mistakes, yet this itself may be a misguided judgement and historical bias, based on limited knowledge of the goals of the takers of elixirs. Certainly, the succession of important persons that continued to take these mineral elixirs with the full knowledge of the death of previous takers points to a concept that goes beyond their toxicity. The succession of Tang emperors from the 9th century on who died from these elixirs created in their own alchemical laboratories, Hsien Tsung (Xian Zong), Mu Tsung (Mu Zong), Ching Tsung (Jing Zong), Wu Tsung (Wu Zong), and Hsuan Tsung (Xuan Zong), testify to the persistence of developing and taking these complex mineral elixirs despite the knowledge that they would die from them.

    Philosophy is a word that comes from the Greek philos, to love, and sophia, wisdom. The word was created to describe these early scientists, who were driven by a love for wisdom itself, or understanding of what is true, right and lasting. Pythagoras was believed to be the first to use our term philosopher, instead of sophist, or wise man, because he thought that a true scientist was driven by a love of knowledge and discovery rather than an ownership of wisdom, or an arguer for an individual interpretation. He realized that wisdom itself was too complex for the individual to claim ownership of, and that the truthful and modest scientist devoted his or her life to the search for a fundamental understanding of our nature that would always be eluding the individual with his limited scope of understanding, but would add to our collective cosmology. The Chinese words for philosophy are varied, with a variety of fundamental meanings, but the most fundamental of these words, zhe li, holds the meaning of wisdom of a sage, or the theories of the sages, the zhe ren, literally the "wise humans". This expresses the esteem still held for these historic sages, or xian, and their ties to Nature, or the mountain, rather than the Greek philosophers, rooted in the city. The character for zhe in this case combines the character for another zhe, which holds the meaning for 'be convinced' as well as 'to change or turn back', over the character for kou, which holds the meaning of an 'entrance to the cave', the 'mouth of the river', or a gateway, as well as mouth, indicating a fundamental meaning of convincing language in this term. This etymology expresses the deep respect in Chinese culture for these ancient individuals who studied what later was called Daoism and alchemy, the xian, or mountain sages, who were also referred to as sheng ren, jun zi, and zhi zhe.

    The acclaimed Cambridge historian Joseph Needham states that we find the earliest printed scientific books, and the earliest examples of chemical lexicography, in the entire human civilization, in China. We also find the earliest support of chemical, metallurgical and pharmaceutical research by the State in ancient China.

    Dr. Needham devoted the fifth volume of his life's work, Science and Civilization in China, to the study of Alchemical history. In this text he clearly outlines the parallel timeline of the alchemical emphasis in metallurgy turning to medical application in both China and in the Hellenistic Greek and Arab civilizations. He notes that in the Zhou, Qin and Early Han dynasties, the emphasis was on Qiu, or 'searching for', while in the Later Han the alchemical emphasis was on Lian, or 'effecting chemical transformation in', as in smelting, but by the Later Han period, in the third century A.D. a union of the two traditions occurred, with a great interest in the science of effecting chemical transformations in medicine, and both the transformations in the laboratory, and inside the human organism (macrobiotics). Thus a series of yin yang branching occurred in alchemical science, finally achieving an emphasis on Wai Dan and Nei Dan. Dr. Needham sees this same branching of alchemy in the Greek and Arab cultures in the same time frame.

  2. #2
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    Taoist-Yoga-Alchemy-and-Immortality

    Taoist-Yoga-Alchemy-and-Immortality



    POINTS VG1 • GV1 • Chτ Kyτ • Chang Qiang or Chang Chiang • VG1 • Long Strong. Luo Connecting Point of the Governing Vessel to CV1. Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Conception Vessel. Location: (1) Midway between the anus and the tip of the coccyx. (2) At the tip of the coccyx. > Treats Hemorrhoids, Benefits the Two Lower Yin, Activates the Channel, Calms the Spirit, Alleviates Pain.


    > Anal Prolapse • Clonic Spasm • Consitpation • Diarrhea • Hemorrhoids • Impotence • Lumbar Pain • Lumbar Spinal Pain • Mental Disorders • Sacral Pain • Seizures • Tetany • Urinary Dysfunction •

    VG2 • GV2 • Yo Yu • Yao Shu • VG2 • Lumbar Shu.

    Location: (1) On the posterior midline at the sacral hiatus. (2) At the center of the sacral angle.

    > Strengthens the Lumbar Region and Legs, Dispels Wind Damp.
    > Epilepsy • Hemorrhoids • Lumbar Pain • Irregular Menses • Sacral Pain • Spinal Pain •

    VG3 • GV3 • Koshi no Yτ Kan • Yao Yang Guan or Yao Yang Kuan • VG3 • Lumbar Yang Pass.

    Location: (1) On the lower back, below the spinous process of the fourth lumbar vertebra (L4). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 4th and 5th lumbar vertebrae.

    > Dispels Wind Damp, Strengthens the Lumbar Region and Legs, Regulates the Lower Burner.
    > Impotence • Knee Disorders • Leg Numbness • Leg Paralysis • Leukorrhea • Lumbar Pain • Irregular Menses • Seminal Emissions • Vomiting •

    VG4 • GV4 • Mei Mon • Ming Men • VG4 • Life Gate.
    Reunion point on Curious Meridian Dai Mo.

    Location: (1) On the lower back, below the spinous process of the second lumbar vertebra (L2). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 2nd and 3rd lumbar vertebrae.

    > Clears Heat, Regulates the Governing Vessel, Tonifies the Kidneys, Benefits the Lumbar Spine.
    > Abdominal Pain • Anal Prolapse • Bone Disorders • Diarrhea • Headache • Headache Splitting • Impotence • Intestinal Disorders • Leukorrhea • Lumbar Pain • Lumbar Sprain • Irregular Monthly • Sciatica • Seminal Emissions • Uterine Bleeding Abnormal •

    VG5 • GV5 • Ken Sϋ • Xuan Shu or Hsuan Shu • VG5 • Suspended Pivot.

    Location: (1) On the lower back, below the spinous process of the first lumbar vertebra (L1). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 1st and 2nd lumbar vertebrae.

    > Benefits the Lumbar Spine, Regulates the Lower Burner.
    > Diarrhea • Lumbar Spinal Pain and Stiffness • Undigested Food in Stool •

    VG6 • GV6 • Seki Chϋ • Ji Zhong or Chi Chung • VG6 • Spinal Center.

    Location: (1) On the middle back, below the spinous process of the eleventh thoracic vertebra (T11). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 11th and 12th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Regulates the Spleen, Benefits the Spine, Drains Damp.
    > Diarrhea • Epilepsy • Hemorrhoids • Jaundice • Lumbar Spinal Stiffness • Rectal Prolapse •

    VG7 • GV7 • Chϋ Sϋ • Zhong Shu or Chung Shu • VG7 • Central Pivot.

    Location: (1) On the middle back, below the spinous process of the tenth thoracic vertebra (T10). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 10th and 11th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Benefits the Spine, Regulates the Middle Burner.
    > Abdominal Fullness • Lumbar and Back Pain • No Desire to Eat • Spinal Stiffness •

    VG8 • GV8 • Kin Shuku • Jin Suo or Chin So • VG8 • Sinew Contraction.

    Location: (1) On the middle back, below the spinous process of the ninth thoracic vertebra (T9). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 9th and 10th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Soothes the Liver, Calms the Spirit, Expels Wind, Relieves Spasm.
    > Anger Injuring the Liver • Epilepsy • Spinal Stiffness and Contraction • Stomach Pain •

    VG9 • GV9 • Shi Yo • Zhi Yang or Chih Yang • VG9 • Extremity of Yang.

    Location: (1) On the middle back, below the spinous process of the seventh thoracic vertebra (T7), approximately level with the lower angle of the scapula. (2) Between the spinous processes of the 7th and 8th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Regulates the Spleen, Treats Jaundice, Unbinds the Chest, Drains Damp, Regulates the Middle Burner.
    > Appetite Absent • Asthma • Back Pain • Borborygmus • Chest Discomfort • Chest Pain • Cough • Dyspnea • Emaciation • Gastric Disorders • Hypochondriac Region Fullness • Jaundice • Limb Heaviness • Liver Disorders • Stomach Cold •

    VG10 • GV10 • Lei Dai • Ling Tai • VG10 • Spirit Tower.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the sixth thoracic vertebra (T6). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 6th and 7th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Cough and Wheezing Alleviates, Clears Heat and Detoxifies Poison.
    > Asthma • Back Pain • Carbuncles and Furuncles • Cough • Dyspnea • Neck Stiffness • Respiratory Disorders • Spleen Heat •

    VG11 • GV11 • Shin Do • Shen Dao or Shen Tao • VG11 • Spirit Path.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the fifth thoracic vertebra (T5). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 5th and 6th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Tonifies the Heart and Lung, Clears Heat, Calms the Spirit, Expels Wind.
    > Back Pain • Cardiac Conditions • Cough • Disorientation • Fright Palpitations • Poor Memory • Sadness • Spinal Pain • Worry •

    VG12 • GV12 • Shin Chϋ • Shen Zhu or Shen Chu • VG12 • Body Pillar.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the third thoracic vertebra (T3). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 3rd and 4th thoracic vertebrae.

    > Clears Heat from the Lung and Heart, Calms the Spirit, Expels Wind.
    > Agitation • Aphasia from Stroke • Asthma • Back Pain • Carbuncles and Furuncles • Cardiac Conditions • Cough • Dyspnea • Hysteria • Lumbar Stiffness • Mental Dryness • Respiratory Disorders • Seizures •

    VG13 • GV13 • To Do • Tao Dao or Tao Tao • VG13 • Kiln Path.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Bladder Channel.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the first thoracic vertebra (T1). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 1st and 2nd thoracic vertebrae.

    > Clears Heat, Regulates the Governing Vessel, Treats Malaria.
    > Bone Disorders • Dizziness • Fever • Fever and Chills • Headache • Malaria • Mental Disorders • Perspiration Absent • Seizures • Spinal Pain •

    VG14 • GV14 • Dai Tsui • Daz Hui or Ta Chui • VG14 •Great Hammer
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the six yang channels. Sea of ​​Qi Point.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertebra (C7). (2) Between the spinous processes of the 7th cervical vertebra and the 1st thoracic vertebra.

    > Expels Wind, Clears Heat, Treats Malaria, Tonifies Deficiency, Firms the Exterior.
    > Asthma • Bone Disorders • Chest Discomfort • Cough • Dyspnea • Eczema • Fever • Heat Stroke • Hypertension • Insomnia • Malaria • Mental Disorders • Neck Stiffness • Nosebleed • Perspiration at Night • Respiratory Disorders • Rib Constriction • Seizures • Shoulder Pain • Speech Impaired • Spinal Pain •

    VG15 • GV15 • Mon • Ya Men • VG15 • Mute's Gate.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Yang Linking Vessel.

    Location: (1) Below the spinous process of the first cervical vertebra (C1). (2) About 2 cm shorter than GV16.

    > Benefits the Tongue, Expels Wind, Benefits the Neck and Spine, Treats Muteness.
    > Deafness • Fever and Chills • Flaccid Tongue • Headache • Occipital Headache • Loss of Voice Sudden • Mental Disorders • Neck Stiffness • Nosebleed • Seizures • Stiff Tongue • Windstroke •

    VG16 • GV16 • Fϋ Fu • VG16 • Wind Mansion.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Yang Linking Vessel. Sea of ​​Marrow Point.

    Location: (1) On the posterior head, 0.5 cun directly below the external occipital protuberance. (2) On the medial line of the nape on the lower surface of the occipital bone.

    > Expels Wind, Strengthens the Sea of ​​Marrow, Calms the Spirit, Benefits the Head and Neck.
    > Epistaxis • Headache • Hemiplagia • Loss of Voice Sudden • Mania • Neck Pain • Neck Stiffness • Sudden Inability to Speak Windstroke • Suicidal Tendencies • Throat Pain and Swollen • Vertigo • Visual Dizziness • Windstroke •

    VG17 • GV17 • No Ko • Nao Hu • VG17 • Brain's Door.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Bladder Channel.

    Location: (1) On the posterior head, 1.5 cun directly above the external occipital protuberance. (2) Directly superior to the lateral occipital eminence.

    > Expels Wind, Benefits the Eyes, Calms the Spirit, Alleviates Pain.
    > Dizziness • Epilepsy • Facial Pain • Headache • Heaviness of the Head • Neck Pain and Stiffness •

    VG18 • GV18 • Kyτ Kan • Qiang Jian or Chiang Chien • VG18 • Unyielding Space.

    Location: (1) On the posterior head, 2.5 cun directly above the external occipital protuberance. (2) About 1/3 of the way from GV17 to GV20.

    > Expels Wind, Calms the Spirit, Alleviates Pain.
    > Epilepsy • Headache • Insomnia • Mania and Depression • Neck Stiffness with Inability to Rotate • Vertigo with Agitation • Visual Dizziness •

    GG19 • GV19 • Go Cho • Hou Ding or Hou Ting • VG19 • Behind the Vertex.

    Location: (1) On the posterior head, 4 cun directly above the external occiptal protuberance. (2) About 1/3 of the way from GV20 to GV17.

    > Expels Wind, Calms The Spirit, Alleviates Pain.
    > Aversion to Wind and Cold • Epilepsy • Headache • Insomnia • Mania • Visual Dizziness •

    VG20 • GV20 • Hyaku E • Bai Hui or Pai Hui • VG20 • Hundred Meetings.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the six yang channels.

    Location: (1) On the midsagittal line, at the intersection of a line connecting the right and left ear apices. (2) On the 1st anterior line (former medial line) of the head, halfway between the frontal hairline and the vertex of the occipital eminence.

    > Expels Wind, Yang Raises and Prolapse Counters, Benefits the Head, Strengthens the Sea of ​​Marrow, Calms the Brain, Calms the Spirit, Clears the Sense Organs, Yang Subdues.
    > Agitation • Anal Prolapse • Deafness • Dizziness • Headache • Vertex Headache • Hemiplegia • Hemorrhoids • Hypertension • Jaw Disorders • Memory Impaired • Mental Disorders • Nosebleed • Seizures • Shock • Tinnitus • Uterine Prolapse • Vertigo • Windstroke •

    VG21 • GV21 • Zen Cho • Qian Ding or Chien Ting • VG21 • Before the Vertex.
    Location: (1) On the midsagittal line, 1.5 cun previous to the intersection of the line connecting the right and left ear apices. (2) Halfway between GV20 and GV22.

    > Expels Wind, Benefits the Head, Treats Convulsions.
    > Dizziness • Epilepsy • Facial Redness and Swelling • Nasal Congestion • Vertex Headache •

    VG22 • GV22 • Shin E • Xin Hui or Hsin Hui • VG22 • Fontanelle Meeting.

    Location: (1) On the midline, 2 cun later to the previous hairline. (2) About 2/5 of the way from GV24 to GV20.

    > Benefits the Nose, Expels Wind, Benefits the Head.
    > Headache • Loss of Sense of Smell • Nasal Congested • Vertigo • Visual Dizziness •

    VG23 • GV23 • Jo Sei • Shang Xing or Shang Hsing • VG23 • Upper Star.

    Location: (1) On the midline, 1 cun posterior to the previous hairline. (2) Halfway between GV24 and GV20.

    > Benefits the Nose and Eyes, Expels Wind, Calms the Spirit, Benefits the Head and Face, Reduces Swelling.
    > Dizziness • Eye Disorders • Facial Edema • Headache • Mental Disorders • Nasal Congestion • Nasal Polyps • Nosebleed • Respiratory Disorders •

    VG24 • GV24 • Shin Tei • Shen Ting • VG24 • Spirit Court.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Bladder and Stomach Channels.

    Location: (1) On the midline, 0.5 cun later to the previous hairline. (2) On the medial line of the head at the frontal hairline.

    > Calms the Brain, Expels Wind, Benefits the Nose and Eyes, Calms the Spirit, Benefits the Head.
    > Epilepsy • Fright Palpitations • Frontal Headache • Insomnia • Nasal Congestion and Discharge • Rhinitis • Vertigo • Visual Dizziness •

    VG25 • GV25 • So Lyτ • Su Liao • VG25 • White Bone Hole.

    Location: (1) At the tip of the nose. (2) At the vertex of the tip of the nose.

    > Benefits the Nose
    > Hypotension • Nasal Congestion • Nasal Polyps • Nosebleed • Respiratory Disorders •

    VG26 • GV26 • Sui Kτ • Shui Gou or Jen Chung • VG26 • Water Trough.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Large Intestine and Stomach Channels.

    Location: (1) In the philtrum, 1/3 the distance from the nose and the top of the lip. (2) At the 1/3 point of the philtrum.

    > Consciousness Revives, Benefits the Face and Nose, Benefits the Spine, Calms the Spirit, Treats Acute Lumbar Sprain, Expels Wind.
    > Abdominal Pain • Cardiac Pain • Coma • Edema • Eye Deviation • Facial Edema • Jaw Disorders • Lip Tremor • Loss of Consciousness • Lumbar Pain • Lumbar Sprain • Lumbar Stiffness • Mental Disorders • Mouth Deviation • Nasal Congestion • Nosebleed • Seizures • Shock • Syncope •

    VG27 • GV27 • Da Tan • Dui Duan or Tui Tuan • VG27 • Extremity of the Mouth.
    Reunion Point on the Governing with the Conception Vessels.

    Location: (1) At the junction of the philtrum with the upper lip. (2) At the center of the upper lip where the skin meets the mucous membrane.

    > Clears Heat, Calms the Spirit, Generates Fluids, Benefits the Mouth.
    > Epistaxis Ceaseless • Painful Gums • Lips Swelling and Stiffness • Mania and Depression • Nasal Congested •

    GG28 • GV28 • Gin Kτ • Yin Jiao or Yin Chiao • VG28 • Gum Intersection.
    Meeting Point on the Governing Vessel with the Conception Vessel.

    Location: (1) In the mouth, at the junction of the frenulum of the upper lip with the upper gum. (2) The point where the superior frenulum meets the gums.

    > Erosion of the Gums • Gum Pain and Swelling and Redness • Gums Bleeding • Mania and Depression • Nasal Congested • Nasal Sores •

    Going to attempt to explain some of the points here but I would recommend some reading before proceeding

    https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/taoist...3&idiq=5307778

    This book lists many locations to the reader as if he should completely understand their positions in correlation to human anatomy. A better understanding of Chinese Traditional Medicine will be a great help to people unfamiliar so here is a chart with explanation of the Governing Vessel or GV.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    Page 1 - 4 of Taoist-Yoga-Alchemy-and-Immortality by Charles Luk

    Fixing Spirit in its Original Cavity



    pg 4. Question:
    "Will you please give me the exact position of the original cavity of spirit?"

    Answer
    It is in the center of the brain the spot between the eyes. Lao Tsu called it "the Gateway to Heaven and Earth." Hence he urged people to concentrate on its center in order to realize the oneness of all things. In this center is a pearl the size of a grain of rice, which is the center of heaven and earth within the human body ie the microcosm. It is the cavity of prenatal vitality. To know where it lies is not enough, for it does not include the wondrous light of essential nature which is symbolized by a circle which Confucius called virtuous perfection (jen) ; The Book of Change calls it ultimateless (wu chi), the Buddha perfect knowledge , and the Taoist the elixir of immortality or spiritual light; which all point to the prenatal One True Vitality. He who knows this cavity can prepare the elixir of immortality . Hence it is said "When the One is attained, all problems are solved."

    My master Liao Jan said " If the original cavity of spirit is overlooked true breath will not stay permanently , spirit will lack a basis for sublimation, the alchemical agent will be incomplete, and the golden elixir cannot be produced."

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