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Thread: Most affordable yet sufficient distilling equipment for alchemy?

  1. #1
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    Most affordable yet sufficient distilling equipment for alchemy?

    Where would you say you can get it and how many liters or ml is sufficient for most work in general? Say if you live in Australia.

  2. #2
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    What material are you working with?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmuldvich View Post
    What material are you working with?
    Planning on working with whatever materials the old alchemists used that requires the distilling process.

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    What is Distillation?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphim View Post
    What is Distillation?
    Hi Seraphim

    Try Google ....it's a good place to start.

    I'm sure you will find a lot of information about distillation there.

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    Thanks Black, all these processes seem a bit confusing still trying to learn the meanings of Distillation, Coagulation, Calcination, Putrefaction, Sublimation, Circulation, Conjunction, Multiplication etc.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphim View Post
    Thanks Black, all these processes seem a bit confusing still trying to learn the meanings of Distillation, Coagulation, Calcination, Putrefaction, Sublimation, Circulation, Conjunction, Multiplication etc.

    It takes time Seraphim and Reading, Reading, Reading, Praying, Meditating
    and Working in the Laboratory.

    IMO a university doctorate is nothing compared to the amount of reading, study
    and hard work that is needed to get a Very Basic understanding of Alchemy.

    The majority of people that take an interest in Alchemy think that they can quickly
    flick through any Alchemy book and produce the Philosophers Stone in a few weeks.

    Not going to happen !!!

    I know this from personal experience.

    Many are called to this Great Work but few are chosen.

    The reason is that most people are not prepared to apply themselves to the Work that
    is required to attain to any level of Understanding of Alchemy.

    The best advice I can give you is ... read, read, read, pray, meditate ...........

  8. #8
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    In reply to the OP:

    Even though this is a bit tricky as there can be so many variables involved, I think something like this should be your baseline:

    https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Dis...gateway&sr=8-1

    That should enable you to reproduce many of the distillations described in the classical texts. However, some tasks may require additional equipment.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seraphim View Post
    Thanks Black, all these processes seem a bit confusing still trying to learn the meanings of Distillation, Coagulation, Calcination, Putrefaction, Sublimation, Circulation, Conjunction, Multiplication etc.

    "Though the ancient Philosophers have written diversely of this science, concealing under a multitude of names the true principles of the Art; yet have they not done it but upon important considerations, as we shall hereafter make appear. And though they are different in their expressions, yet are they not any way discordant one from another, but all aiming at one end, and speaking of the same thing, they have thought fit (above all the rest) to name the proper Agent, by a term, strange, nay sometimes contrary to its nature and qualities. Know also that he, who shall sublime our Philosophical Mercury (wherein is all the vertue of our Stone) as it ought to be done, shall perfect the Magistery. This gave Geber reason to say that all perfection consists in Sublimation, and in this Sublimation all other operations, that is to say, Distillation, Assation, Destruction, Coagulation, Putrefaction, Calcination, Fixation, Reduction of the White and Red Tinctures, procreated and engendered in one furnace and in one vessel, and this is the ready way to the final consummation, whereof the Philosophers have made divers chapters, purposely to amuse the ignorant."
    -The True Book Of The Learned Greek Abbot Synesius


    "For now the Philosophers say: "dissolve the thing, and sublimate it, and then distill it, coagulate it, make it ascend, make it descend, soak it, dry it, and ever up to an indefinite number of operations, all of which take place at the same time and in the same vessel." Alphidius confirms this and says: "You must know that when we dissolve we sublimate as well and calcinate without interruption," and if our Corpus is being thrown into the water, for the purpose of dissolution, it first turns black, then separates itself, dissolving and sublimating, it unites itself with the spirit which is its origin and birth."
    -Salomon Trismosin, Splendor Solis


    "Know also that there is only one thing in the whole world that enters into the composition of the Stone, and that, therefore, all coagulation, and admixture, of different ingredients, would shew you to be on a wrong scent altogether. If you could perform all the different operations of our art, yet all your dissolving, coagulating, decomposing, distilling, augmenting, albefying, &c., would be useless, without a true knowledge of our Matter. For our Art is good and precious, nor can any one become a partaker of it, unless it be revealed to him by God, or unless he be taught by a skilled Master. It is a treasure such as the whole world cannot buy. Do not, therefore, my sons, spend your toil until you know what that is on which you are to operate. For even if you knew the right Matter, your information would be useless to you without a knowledge of the method of preparing it."
    -The Glory Of The World


    "In our glorious Art nothing is more necessary than constant reference to the facts of Nature, which can be ascertained only by actual experiment. The dross which is purged off by means of the natural operation must be removed by the artist, if his work is to prosper. The philosopher Socrates directs us to seek the cold of the Moon that we may find the heat of the Sun, and to exercise the hands so that the laborious nature of the work may be lightened. Hence it is all but impossible, as we may learn from Geber in his Sum of Perfection, for a blind man, or one whose sense of touch is defective, to be successful in or Magistery. The experience of sight is essential, more especially at the end of the decoction; when all superfluous matter has been removed, the artist will behold an awful and amazing splendour, the occultation of Sol in Luna, the marriage of East and West, the union of heaven and earth, and the conjunction, as the ancients tell us, of the spiritual with the corporeal. In that process of cooling, as we may learn from the Turba Philosophorum, Hermes, and Avicenna, the manifest is concealed, while that which was concealed is made manifest. The first operation, which is done by hand, is the first stage of the work, which consists in Sublimation and Purification. The second operation, in which the artist has nothing to do but look on, is the second stage of the work. Here the purified and sublimed substance is fixed and becomes solid. This operation should bring about the perfection of our substance. No one can exercise our Magistery in the absence of the practical teaching of experience, without which the most diligent poring over books would be useless. The words of the Sages may mean anything or nothing to one who is not acquainted with the facts which they describe. If the son of knowledge will persevere in the practical study of our Art, it will in due time burst upon his enchanted vision. The study of books cannot be dispensed with, but the study of books alone is not sufficient. There must be a profound natural faculty for interpreting the significance of those symbols and analogies of the philosophers, which in one place have one meaning and in another a different. For, as Morienus tells us, all books on Alchemy are figuratively written. By theory and practice working together, you will be led to the fruition of the most precious Arcanum, which is the greatest and most wonderful treasure of this world. If you think that you have understood the directions of the Sages, put your impression to a practical test; if you were mistaken, Nature will take good care to correct your error, and if you will follow her guidance and take her suggestions, she may, after several experiments, put you in the right path."
    -Peter Bonus, The New Pearl Of Great Price


    "When the Alchemist, in the course of course of his decoction and putrefaction, has reached the end of the first part of our Magistery, in which is seen the simple white colour, before the appearance of any other colours, then he must straightway set about the second part of the work, and this second part is the ferment and the fermentation of the substance. Then, if all elements are evenly combined without being touched by hand, the artist is a rich man, and has no need, thenceforth, in repeating the work, to repeat all his former mistakes. But, if he does not combine the elements evenly, the whole substance will vanish into thin air, and the Alchemist will have lost his hoped-for riches. If, says Haly, you do not find this Stone, when it germinates, no other will arise in its place. Beware, says Plato, lest in the fermentation you come to a bitter end. If there be any hindrance or obstacle in the solution, there will most likely be corruption in the augmenting. The right moment must be seized here, as in all other things. When you are baking bread or sweetmeats, or any other solid substance, the moment will arise when they are perfectly done; and if after that moment you leave them in the oven ever so short a time, they will be marred, burnt, and destroyed. Haly compares the preparation of our Stone to that of soap, which is spoiled if boiled beyond a certain point. Hence the artist must be extremely watchful, and as soon as the substance has reached its most subtle stage, he must put an end to the digestive process; if he pushes it any further, the combined forces of the fire and the volatile part of the substance overcome its fixed part, and the whole evaporated. He who knows how to pacify and assuage the hostility of the elements will be successful in our Magistery, but no other. The object of what has been said is to shew that at the close of the perfect decoction and putrefaction, Nature, by the ministration of our Art, generates a bare simple matter, not united to its form; this matter the Ancients called first matter, on account of its resemblance to the first matter of the world, before it received its form. This matter needs to be united to its form, which form is the ferment, and is hidden in its womb. This conjunction must take place immediately the matter is born; the same will then become durable and imperishable. Nature, unassisted, cannot effect this union, because it is irrational, and its operations go on forever in successive renovation and destruction; but the Artist can watch the proper moment, and preserve that which the fire has generated. Now, when the conjunction has taken place, the substance has nothing more to fear from the fire. If one only knows the right moment, the conjunction is a very easy process; and when it takes place, there are many wonderful phenomena, as Morienus testifies. It is brought about by a well-tempered fire, the action of which is stopped by a watchful artist. And this conjunction accomplished, it is open to the artist to rest. Socrates, in the Turba Philosophorum, says that what follows is woman’s work and child’s play. Rhasis says that nothing but vigilance is requisite, for as the ablution and depuration of the elements are accomplished by the presence of fire, so are the conjunction, perpetuation, and fermentation of the purified matters performed in the absence of fire."
    -Peter Bonus, An Excellent Introduction To The Art Of Alchemy


    "Therefore our Stone is from one thing only, as is aforesaid, and it is performed by one Act or Work, with decoction: and by one Disposition, or Operation, which is the changing of it first to Black, then to White, thirdly, to Red: and by one Projection, by which the whole Act and Work is finished. From henceforth, let all Pseudo-Chymists, and their Followers, cease from their vain Distillations, Sublimations, Conjunctions, Calcinations, Dissolutions, Contritions, and such other like Vanities."
    -Roger Bacon, Radix Mundi


    "The sophists take occasion to persecute Mercury himself with various torments, as with sublimations, coagulations, mercurial waters, aquafortis, and the like. All these erroneous ways should be avoided, together with other sophistical preparations of minerals, and the purgations and fixations of spirits and metals. Wherefore all the preparations of the stone, as of Geber, Albertus Magnus, and the rest, are sophistical. Their purgations, cementations, sublimations, distillations, rectifications, circulations, putrefactions, conjunctions, solutions, ascensions, coagulations, calcinations, and incinerations are utterly profitless, both in the tripod, in the athanor, in the reverberatory furnace, in the melting furnace, the accidioneum, in dung, ashes, sand, or what not; and also in the cucurbite, the pelican, retort, phial, fixatory, and the rest."
    -Paracelsus, The Aurora Of The Philosophers


    "First of all, then, there must be learnt - digestions, distillations, sublimations, reverberations, extractions, solutions, coagulations, fermentations, fixations, and every instrument which is requisite for this work must be mastered by experience, such as glass vessels, cucurbites, circulators, vessels of Hermes, earthen vessels, baths, blast-furnaces, reverberatories, and instruments of like kind, also marble, coals, and tongs. Thus at length you will be able to profit in Alchemy and in Medicine. But so long as, relying on fancy and opinion, you cleave to your fictitious books, you are fitted and predestinated for no one of these things."
    -Paracelsus, The Book Concerning The Tincture Of The Philosophers


    "The Alchymists who have given their minds to their well-nigh innumerable Sublimations, Distillations, Solutions, Congelations, to manifold Extraction of Spirits and Tinctures, and other Operations more subtle than profitable, and so have distracted themselves by a variety of errors, as so many tormentors, will never be inclined again by their own Genius to the plain way of Nature and light of Truth; from whence their industrious subtilty hath twined them, and by twinings and turnings, as by the Lybian Quicksands, hath drowned their entangled Wits: the only hope of safety for them remaineth in finding out a faithful Guide and Master, who may make the Sun clear and conspicuous unto them and free themselves from darkness. Let a Student of these secrets carefully beware of reading or keeping company with false Philosophers; for nothing is more dangerous to a learner of any Science, than the company of an unskilled or deceitful man by whom erroneous principles are stamped as true, whereby a simple and credulous mind is seasoned with false Doctrine. Let a Lover of truth make use of few authors, but of the best note and experience truth; let him suspect things that are quickly understood, especially in Mystical Names and Secret Operations; for truth lies hid in obscurity; for Philosophers never write more deceitfully - than when plainly, nor ever more truly - than when obscurely."
    -Jean D'Espagnet, Hermetic Arcanum


    "He who builds a road must allow himself to be judged by everybody. Thus I have no doubt that my book will suffer the same fate and that different verdicts will be pronounced on it. One man will say that I am doing what another had already done long ago, and that this process is so well known that it is unnecessary to waste so much paper on it. Another will state the contrary, saying that it is wrong to throw pearls before the sows and to put food into the mouth of every ungrateful crow; that one should keep those arcana secret and not make them too common. But these two judges should know that they are both wrong. The first must not think that I have patched this work together from other authors like a beggar's coat, adorning myself with other peoples feathers. If I had wanted to do that, I would not have undertaken to explain and elucidate Poppius as a signpost. True, I must admit that many books on distillations and processes are available and that almost the whole world is filled with them, but how incorrect they are and how badly a beginner fares with them is proven by the experience, unfortunately. I remember what happened to me in my youth when I wasted time and much money on such a wrong process. Many a man may well write a process that is clear enough to an experienced chymist, no matter how obscure it is. To a beginner, however, it is not only of no use but rather confusing and damaging - as some of our author's also are - and he gets so mixed up with them that he can never get out of this labyrinth unless he obtains an Ariadne's thread."
    -Joannes Agricola, Treatise On Gold


    "I shall now crave leave to give an account of some philosophical preparations of the philosophers gold and silver. For indeed the art of preparing them is the true alchemy, in comparison of which all the chemical discoveries are but abortives and found out by accident, viz., by endeavoring after this. I would not have the world believe that I pretend to the understanding of them. Yet I would have them know that I am not incredulous as touching the possibility of that great philosophical work which many have so much labored after and may have found. To me there is nothing in the world seems more possible, and whosoever shall without prejudice read over the book entitled The New Light Of Alchemy shall almost whether he will or not (unless he resolves not to believe anything though never so credible) be convinced of the possibility of it. What unworthiness God saw in gold more than in other things that he should deny the seed of multiplication (which is the perfection of the creatures) to it, and give it to all things besides, seems to me to be a question as hard to be resolved, yea, and harder than the finding out the elixir itself, in the discovering of which the greatest difficulty is, not to be convinced of the 177 easiness thereof. If the preparations were difficult many more would find it out than do (says Sendivogius) for they cast themselves upon most difficult operations and are very subtle in difficult discoveries which the philosophers never dreamed of. Nay, says the aforenamed author, if Hermes himself were now living together with subtle witted Geber and most profound Raimund Lullie, they would be accounted by our chemists not for philosophers, but rather for learners. They were ignorant of those so many distillations, so many circulations, so many calcinations, and so many other innumerable operations of artists nowadays used which, indeed, men of this age did find out and invented out of their books. Yet there is one thing wanting to us which they did, viz., to know how to make the Philosophers Stone."
    -John French, The Art Of Distillation


    "And leave all blind warkes that thow has seene or heard of Conclusions
    Or proved by Sublimations, Preperations, Distillations, or Dissolutions;
    Of such manner of things greate Bokes do greatly specifie
    And all those contrary sayings in this Craft I do plainly deny."
    -Liber Patris Sapientiae


    "I John Pontan have travelled over many regions, that I might learn something that was certain concerning the philosophers stone; and, compassing almost the whole world, met with none but impostors, false deceivers, and no philosophers: But studying always, doubting much, and casting every way, at length I found the truth: But when I knew the matter, I erred two hundred times before I found the true matter, with the operation, and practice upon it. First, I fell to putrefie the matter nine months together, and found nothing: I put it in St. Mary's Bath for a certain time, and erred in that, as before. Then for three months I put it to a fire of Calcination, and wrought amisse: all manner of Distillations, and Sublimations, such as the Philosophers, as Geber, Archelaus, and almost all the rest, say, or seem to say, should be used, I practised; and found nothing still. Then again I tryed to perfect the subject of the whole alchymical art, all the wayes that can be imagined; by baths, by dungs, by ashes, and a multiplicity of other fires, which are yet found in the philosophers books; and yet for all that I found no good. Wherefore, for three years continued, I studied the philosophers' books, but chiefly the works of Hermes alone, whose shorter words comprehend the whole stone; although he speaks obscurely of the Superior, and Inferior, of the Heaven, and of the Earth."
    -John Pontanus, Epistle On The Mineral Fire


    "I know that all this is sheer nonsense, and that such men are only deceiving themselves and others. I am also aware that only God can produce anything out of the elements. He alone knows how to mingle and combine them in their due proportions. For He alone is the Creator and Author of all good things, and there is nothing in the world that He has not made. Therefore, let the charlatans cease their vain-glorious talk, and remember that they can never hope to gather where they cannot sow; let them make an end of their false calcinations, sublimations, distillations, by which they extract the spirit in a vaporous form, and of their juggling coagulations and congelations, by which they pretend, even among the initiated, to be able rightly to separate the elements of gold and quicksilver. It is certainly true that all things under heaven are composed of the four elements, and mixed of them according to the due proportion of their genus and species; but it is not simply the union of the four elements, but their being combined in a certain way, which constitutes the substance of the Philosophical Stone."
    -Jean de Meung, The Remonstrance of Nature


    "Those who want to accomplish our Work through digestions, through common distillations, and similar sublimations, and others by triturations, all these people are off the good path, in great error and difficulty, and they will never succeed because all these names, words, and manners of operation are names, words, and manners of metaphor."
    -Jacques Tesson, Le grand et Excellent Oeuvre des Sages







    Quote Originally Posted by KnowledgeSeeker View Post

    No. That is not a good distillation setup. It is indeed a good, cheap way to learn if you are interested in things other than Alchemy although much better setups exist. You can still learn much and utilize what you learn from this setup and then transfer that knowledge over to Alchemical processes more in line with the Ancients, should you choose to do so.

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