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Thread: Primum Ens Sanguinis

  1. #11
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    Does anyone have any links/images of this "red fluid" the Ens of Blood which is separated? I wonder if it is strictly red or can be other colors as well like shades of yellow or orange depending on concentration? Also are Ens clear or cloudy/misty?

    Last edited by Seraphim; 08-10-2019 at 03:45 PM.

  2. #12
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    Here is an image of the red Ens separating. Unfortunately I was unable to separate and collect the red fluid from the mixture (mostly because I didnít know what to do at the time).

    Iíve also read that some Ens/Quintessences can be green, but I havenít personally seen this.
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  3. #13
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    Thank you Kiorionis. Is the red Ens coming from the sediment? I found an essential oil of St John's Wort (online) but I don't know if it qualifies as an Ens/Quintessence. Is there a difference between an essential oil and an Ens? What is the function of an Ens?
    Last edited by Seraphim; 08-12-2019 at 01:53 AM.

  4. #14
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    Good questions. The Ens has an energetic component to it, from my experience, and the essential oils are just chemical compounds which the body uses. So the difference is, the body uses its own energy resources to metabolize an essential oil, but the Ens provides the energy itself. Again this is from my own experience.

    That’s a nice looking EO of St. John’s Wort. Usually they are clear or slightly citrine. But I’ve never worked on SJW, so it could just be it’s natural EO color. Yarrow apparently has a dark blue essential oil.

    The Ens in my photo is, in my best guess, coming from a reaction between the sediment (processes plant Salts) and the Menstruum (the orange, cloudy fluid).
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  5. #15
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    Thanks for sharing , that is very helpful information about EO and Ens. Maybe someday I'll give it a try, still very confused atm.
    Last edited by Seraphim; 08-11-2019 at 07:27 PM.

  6. #16
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    I don't know guys. I thought I read somewhere in the forum and also in some book about it being crazy to work with blood like that. I might do it if someone does it first lol. Any brave volunteers? If you do try it can you let me know what effects you got from taking it?

  7. #17
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    A question for Mr. Black and Mr. Kiorionis:

    Through meditation on the subject of my plant research, I've come to lime as being incredibly important for the work, not just on plants but in all kingdoms. Hopefully one day soon I will be able to start experimenting with it, as I have a kiln that should be able to cook a significant amount of ash which I believe can be converted into a potent Mercury. Not surprisingly, while doing some searches online, my thoughts materialized themselves as the alkahest and its precursor, KOH.

    Has there been progress made for you guys? I personally find the description by van Helmont to be distasteful and not in-line with my primitive working model, and in any case incredibly excessive in how it produces the Mercury, which I believe can be made much easier from plant ashes with mere water to combine the potassium and calcium compounds necessary, after they are suitably calxed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiorionis View Post
    Iíve also read that some Ens/Quintessences can be green, but I havenít personally seen this.
    I've gone over the Melissa Ens recipe again, as well as the work of Stavish for producing his veggie stone. There is something in Stavish's treatment of the ash which implies that we are dealing with common KCO3, but read closely and you will see that we are not. There's a particular order that he assigns to the first calcination coming BEFORE leeching, which is an incredibly important step in my current understanding.
    The separation of the Melissa "Ens" is a curious extract, to be sure, but not a proper Ens in form, for a LOT of reasons. I believe the same problem is to blame here. There must be lime, and using only the potassium salt from the ashes is an error. Just my opinion, but it explains some of my failures in my plant work.

    In any case, I believe the bright green color is specific to this extraction that pretends to be an Ens in the literature.


    In short, I plan on doing something very similar to this process, but using water instead of alcohol. I've already had a clue to this with a picture I took of a "phoenix rising" a while back, don't remember the thread.

    If there is anything else you would like to share about your processes, I would love to hear it. Have you prepared the alkahest by van Helmont's recipe? Are you calcining whole ash to snow white before soaking the liquor, be it water or alcohol or whatever?

  8. #18
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    Hi Dragon's Tail

    I always enjoy reading your comments and hearing about the progress you
    are having in your lab.
    Our meditations are always worth listening to ....
    I'm sure that many a good experiment has come from a good meditation !

    I can't comment on the Mercury but I have read where some of the old masters
    suggested to add calcium to pot ashes.
    This process can give a stronger alkali e.g. KOH

    Most of the Ens Process recipes only use the Pot.Carb.
    But I have tried each method and they both give an extraction.

    Have not read Mr. Stavish's work .... so cannot connent.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragon's Tail View Post
    Has there been progress made for you guys?
    Yes, much progress

    If there is anything else you would like to share about your processes, I would love to hear it. Have you prepared the alkahest by van Helmont's recipe? Are you calcining whole ash to snow white before soaking the liquor, be it water or alcohol or whatever?
    The comment I’d make at the present moment is to consider how a plant does anything at all. In order to grow it needs physical building blocks (minerals, chemical elements, etc), water, air, soil bacteria, etc. how does it go about gathering these things from a spagyric and Alchemical perspective? How is this replicated in the lab?

    From my perspective, a plant is composed of Alkali, Acidic, and Neutral parts (the Salt, Sulphur and Mercury); and it’s the internal ‘solve et coagula’ of the plant which plays with the Alkalis and Acids safely within a Neutral Menstruum (“safely” to mean that the chemical interactions brought on by Intelligence don’t over-cook or harm the plant itself).

    I’m sure you can see how Modern spagyrics makes a mess of this by insisting that alcohol, oils and potash are what compose a plant. Where is the Acid component which causes the breaking down of the Alkaline? Potash doesn’t fully dissolve in alcohol, so how is that a true Mercury? Etc. Etc.


    Note: I understand that in chemistry some oils are considered “fatty acids” — but I suspect they look and act much different BEFORE they have been extracted from the plant and analyzed, and that different extraction methods will compose/create different types of “fatty acids”
    Art is Nature in the flask; Nature is a vial thing.

  10. #20
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    Thanks so much for the responses.
    Black:
    yes, this KOH is, I believe, the sal alkali of the ancients, and it's made easier from plant ashes than using minerals, unless you have the right sort handy. Plant ashes are mostly calcium carbonate, which can be calcinated and slaked to become not only water soluble, but also mix with tarter salt to yield KOH, while more calcium carbonate drops out of solution, thus the calcium salt can be re-fired and re-used. KOH has some wonderful properties reported on it's ability to "dissolve everything," etc, including fusing with the glass in the ashes (in the form of fine silica mixed with the rest, and also a rather large inert fraction). So in bringing plant ashes to a true calcining temp before slaking, lots of reactions are taking place in there, including several not mentioned here with the metallic fraction. Also, the glass and chalk make up about 90% in most plants, the tarter and soda around 9%, and the trace metallics, chlorides, etc. the remaining 1% or less. Water makes up about 90% of the plant. They have this number oddity inherent to how they are composed, which is interesting in itself.

    The classic Ens Melissa recipe talks about "salt of tartar," if I recall, but I think this was a deckname for sal alkali or lime, as they have similar properties, and I presume that those properties also mimic the secret solvent. I mentioned Stavish as his classic spagyric is copied everywhere, but the online original sources show a salt that looks very much like KOH.

    Kiorionis:
    Indeed it's a curious thing. My plants grow on sunlight and rainwater. I germinate microgreens in sterile substrate, and without a thing added but water and light, that little seed will grow into a small plant with roots and true leaves before it every needs another thing added. For it to bear fruit, it will require more, in the way of NPK and other nutrients from the earth to nourish it. You offer something quite worth thinking about, comparing the lab work to how a plant gathers what it needs, and that will definitely get some reflection time. Mostly I find myself thinking about how things decay to black.
    I'm definitely not on the normal alcohol train that goes with common spagyrics, but I suppose there are some who compare it because of it's universal nature of being constructed from anything with a carbohydrate chain. Vinegar is likewise curious in that regard (and actually does bond with the matter to make something new rather than dissolving it, per se). Same with the alkalis. That universality drives my research, but still I've drifted from using alcohol for anything but simple herbal tinctures. Curious to the classic Ens process, but ultimately not what I'm after. Just doesn't feel right.

    Just thoughts, thanks again for your respective posts.

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