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Thread: Potable Gold

  1. #1
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    Potable Gold

    I was reading archives and just found this:


    This is the easiest method of getting a "potable gold" I know of (some
    alchemists might consider it silly, but I'm not so sure about...). You just
    have to solve gold chloride (even 0,1 gr might suffice) in acetone, and
    digest it. The gold shall slowly precipitate, but even after some days
    digestion, you still have a yellow coloured solution, as if no more gold
    precipitated any longer. (Question: Why?). The solution may undergo a
    deepening of colour, going yellow -> orange -> red. If you distill or
    evaporate the acetone off, you might try then to distill the red tincture
    which is left behind. This would be best. You might, however, just solve in
    alcohol the tincture (it may extensively be diluted, and still get a
    coloured solution), and add a couple of drops to a glass of water. If you
    are sensiive enough, you should notice the caractheristic effect of gold.
    With a not very perfectionated method, you may certainly also notice the
    caractheristic taste of tinctures produced from acetone, and also a
    metallic taste, but I feel it works fine anyway. If somebody out there
    wants to experiment with it,

    1) Be careful to eliminate first the acidity from the Cl3Au.

    2) Be careful to allow for a sufficient deposition of powder gold.


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  2. #2
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    I tried this years ago and got a green powder from acetone on gold chloride that was crystallized from HCl with iodine or potassium iodide added to it.

    I wonder if it's possible to redissolve this material in HCl. I didn't try.
    It could be interesting if this was repeated. Dissolve, crystallize, add acetone.

    Perhaps adding NH4Cl to the HCl could give an interesting result. I don't think crystallizing HCl that contains ammonium forms a fulminating ammonium gold chloride but I am not sure. I know precipitating gold from an ammonium containing acid forms it but crystallizing the acid I don't know.
    I think somehow dissolving in ammonium rich HCl might 'charge' or change the gold.

    If the material doesn't dissolve in HCl it should certainly dissolve quickly if some H2O2 is added.
    But then no ether extraction could be performed. (I'd like to ether extract and air dry the goldchloride out instead of crystallizing, I hate boiling down acids.)

  3. #3
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    This process (digest goldchloride with acetone) is also mentioned in Robert Bartlett's book "Way of the Crucible'". He used acetone from destruction of lead acetate and sodium acetate but said even commercial acetone works for this; it is only slower.
    There are chromatograph pictures of the two end products from this process: a heavy red oil, and a lighter oil floating on top of it.
    It's interesting how he got oils. When I tried it I got a powder.
    Perhaps it is due to the fact I used a potassium salt during boiling down of the HCl and crystallization of the chloride. Likely the potassium gold chloride in the crystal got the chlorine reacted off by the acetone leaving a potassium gold powder, similar to m-state powders.

  4. #4
    I haven't purchased Bartlett's new book yet. So I'm not sure how he operates, but I suppose he digested the acetone + gold chloride solution for a period of time.

    Did you digest the solution, or just boil it down? I think you'll see the same results if you repeatedly distill this solution a number of times (add gold chloride to acetone, distill to dryness, cohobate, and repeat).

  5. #5
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    I crystallized my gold salt, then poured acetone over it. No digestion. The powder appeared pretty fast. It's been some years and I didn't pay particular attention to it so I don't remember if it appeared right after the reaction or some hours later or the next day, but it was one of these.

    Bartlett said he digested. For quite some time. Too lazy to look it up right now. I think it's a month or four weeks or so he said.

  6. #6
    Yeah, I really think digestion is important here (think maturation). I'm not sure if you would've received the same results as Bartlett due to your gold chloride containing potassium chloride. It might react differently, but I'm not sure. This would be a good test to try though: potassium chloride + acetone vs. gold chloride + acetone. Digest these for a month or so, and see if there's any difference.

    I think gold chloride is acting as a catalyst and causing acetone to bond in different ways. Kind of like an organic reaction that continues to react and evolve. I would like to see the assays of those oils. I think they might be pretty complex. Maybe just as complex (or more so) as the oils obtains from acetate distillations.

    The reaction might start with the reaction of gold chloride with acetone. Probably yielding chloroacetone and gold oxide, and then going from there. From what I've read, gold oxide is a really good catalyst for certain types of reactions.

    This is just a hunch. I really don't have any proof or evidence.
    Last edited by Aleilius; 07-02-2009 at 08:47 PM.

  7. #7
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    One of the components of the oil is said to be mesityl oxide.

  8. #8
    Probably some isophorone too.

    I wonder if this same reaction will take place with gold oxide and acetone.

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